Youth not being exposed to classical music - Is that wrong?

Discuss the pros and cons of various "methods" with other teachers

Postby Tranquillo » Wed Nov 14, 2007 9:36 pm

Oh thats interesting, I suppose that there is so much a teacher can do in regards to classical exposure. I suppose to an extent it is a motivational issue, motivation is something that really should be from within.
There is so much that the teacher can do to encourage the student but in the end its how they react ... and what their view are , which leaves me in wonder of what teacher do do.

To me motivation is like genetics. You could have genes to have freckles ... but if you have never been out in the sun you wouldnt have freckels.
I saw it as somewhat similar, the student has the interest or is not resistant and open not narrow minded, therefore the teacher can nuture the interest and build encouragement to classical.
Makes me then wonder what do teachers do to encourage classical, and Stretto you mentioned that in your experience that they don't really, you found you enjoyed it later, even so it was through passive ways television and by other means. ... I personally, enjoyed classical as a young child when I was around 5 I used to listen to Peter and the Wolf of Prokofiev, Stomp to it and march to it, understand the meaning in school. Later at seven I listened to the school teacher play Mozart and she used to read us a page of his life a day, we loved it!
That all changed as soon as I got to my tween to early teen years. I was a classical music hater, I listend to a lot of rap, hip hop, pop and R&B (urban contemporary) ... What made me turn around was that I wanted to be an 'individual' ... an adolescent psychologist was intereviewed in television what music is suitable for study, he mentioned classical but then was interuppted. I decoded to give it a go to listen to classical music whist I study and a week later listed to rock and pop and all the other stuff I used to listen to , I couldnt believe I used to like it. Thats been years now ... (3 1/2 years) ... I do love classical a lot and appreciatate it a lot more than I used to.
But, I do understand from were you are coming from Stretto, adults assume that teens wont like it. I suppose to a certain extent they would be right to assume, I have said to certain youths that that is the music that I listen to and many either respect it or remark on how boring it it.
As far as encouragement yeah, no teacher has ever said to me listen to this isnt it cool ! and I have been through 6 in total. Its probably only the current piano teacher I am with that has his reccomendations on what is nice sounding and which composer he admires.
Music is organised sound
User avatar
Tranquillo
 
Posts: 465
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:43 pm

Postby Stretto » Wed Nov 14, 2007 10:20 pm

I really have to laugh at what kind of influence the teachers are having on my kids in school in relation to music but they are only 6 and 8 rather than teens. My oldest, when in Kindergarten, the teacher was a big Elvis fan and would play Elvis while the kids were taking rest times sometimes, although she played classical and other things too. Also, on the anniversary of Elvis death she gave a talk about Elvis and they listened to more Elvis music. My daughter at 6 came home rattling off so many Elvis facts faster than one can blink an eye (and excited about how much her teacher liked Elvis).

Also, my youngest daughter now in Kindergarten with the other teacher for that grade at home sings "Happy Days" and really loves it. I couldn't figure out where she would have heard that or how she knew it and it turned out from school. I think they learned it so they could practice the order of the days of the week, "Sunday, Monday, happy days! Tuesday, Wednesday, happy days! . . . " That's what she sings.

I had a college music professor for theory who was a big time Beatles fan also who made us analyze a Beatles piece and gave a lecture on the Beatles to us.

So none of these teachers worried about "what kids these days might like or what they might not care about for learning music". I wouldn't think Kindergarteners would care about Elvis music but what do I know?

I would say teenagers who say classical music is boring are just stereotyping classical music in the same way that some adults might stereotype hip hop or rock as not their type of music.

I was playing through bits and pieces of some classical pieces trying to pick one for myself to learn. I mentioned I don't like a lot of arrangements for piano of pop or rock songs, for example. But I've noticed something else in playing through classical pieces today and have noticed this about myself other times that in actuality I am really picky on what I like for classical music too and there's a lot more classical pieces in playing or listening to that I don't like compared to what I do. So I guess I am very picky there too!

I guess my main goal with students is I want them to be playing good music and learn a variety. Now here we are back to tying into the topic as we had in the thread "good music" again. Perhaps that could be one conclusion of this discussion that teachers should teach a variety of "good music". That has been my quest in selecting music that I might interest students in learning is to pick pieces that fall under the definition of "good music" (for example, those things we talked about in that thread) and not wasting a students time learning or my time teaching music that does not fall under that definition.

However, regardless there is something about classical music that caters better to playing on the piano to me than piano arrangements of pop while one can always find exceptions, probably because the classical piano lit. was originally written for piano, of course, while the others were not. Perhaps flipping that around and have a band play an arrangement of a classical piano lit. piece. It might be nice but can't quite compare to how it sounds on the instrument it was written for. (I do think as mentioned students should learn improv. to play the songs that are popular they like as then they can make it sound any way they want and it be their own rather than someone else's idea of a piano arrangement of those songs and also because there is not music even written in piano form for a big, huge chunk of the songs that students might listen to.)




Edited By Stretto on 1195101820
Stretto
 
Posts: 745
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 10:34 pm
Location: Mo.

Postby Tranquillo » Thu Nov 15, 2007 6:34 pm

Stretto wrote:I would say teenagers who say classical music is boring are just stereotyping classical music in the same way that some adults might stereotype hip hop or rock as not their type of music.

Yeah that could just be it sterotyping. Would you still classify it as sterotyping when the teen has listend to classical before and still does not completly immerse himself/herself? Even so, is classical a taste to sink into and gradually enjoy? I found it was something that was long to listen to at first for a week then I couldnt stand for anything else. Did you find that was the same with you Stretto?

Stretto wrote:I guess my main goal with students is I want them to be playing good music and learn a variety. Now here we are back to tying into the topic as we had in the thread "good music" again. Perhaps that could be one conclusion of this discussion that teachers should teach a variety of "good music". That has been my quest in selecting music that I might interest students in learning is to pick pieces that fall under the definition of "good music" (for example, those things we talked about in that thread) and not wasting a students time learning or my time teaching music that does not fall under that definition.


That sounds great! A variety is important like that food analogy ! The 'good music' is what I agree a teacher should teach... but as far as wasting time do you mean that pop arrangements dont fall under that category? It is true that some of the music that teens listen to today have a bad influence rather than one of a good influence. The times of music is changing. I read a recent article and it critsized that the music teens are listening to is thud generating a gerneration of things badly influenced. Which made me wonder why students do like this music? Is it to fit in with the crowd? Likely? Because of this ... I am asking people in my school and many around my age why they like 'pop' or 'rock' also why they dont enjoy classical ...
I can keep you informed if you like?




Edited By Becibu on 1195173356
Music is organised sound
User avatar
Tranquillo
 
Posts: 465
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:43 pm

Postby Tranquillo » Fri Nov 23, 2007 4:57 am

Some things have occured to me. As Stretto said that adults arent the ones that encourage classical listening to youth and also youths have that stero-typical view of classical. I think that there are a number of contributing factors to the reason that youth dont get his appreciation or 'sensitivity'to music.

Yes, they are sterotyping and restrictive in the sense that they say its slow or long and boring that they wont like it. That is one reason.

Another is that what Stretto did relate to. That is: Adults dont encourage it.

Also I think that even adults dont know classical or listen to classical all that much. My adult friends dont know of classical and most listen to music duing their time (50's - 90's) ... even so ... I have a friend that is in his 60's that hates Jazz.

Well as for me , I think that youth and adults or teachers dont speak the same language in reagards to langauge. They do not engage nor converse with each other to understand each other. Even so, when they do ... as you said Stretto is doesnt work, it backfires. (at least in your experience) ... To me, the only people that are in the 'middle' of this is music teachers. They can see what the whole music scene involves in with youth. They know the lastest hit songs and the bands that attract youth. This is due to the fact that they are constrantly around youth that the teachers themselves have gained this 'exposure'.

Having said that, I have continued with that 'discssion' with my piano teacher the other night. I told him what the music teacher was saying and he began to relise that classical is something gradual. The audience needs to be trained. After a week I decided to perform the song Edelweiss from the sound of music . Although slow and emotional it is reconisable because everyone would have seen sound of music in their life ... if not then they music have been living under a rock. I told my piano teacher what I have choosen for school he disagreed and said that it was slow and not up beat as he espected it to be, he thinks that everyone will fall asleep. Along with that he thinks that all teens listen to rap (which he deems as bad music) ...

This did bring anxiety to me because I have a week to perform! And you know what? I asked almost everyone in my year if they have seem the musical sound of music ... and they have ... its just been a long time since they have watched it again. They have this familiarity which makes me feel comfortable ... with performing it.

Well what my conclusions are ... or what my point is ... is that there is not enough awareness of the student and teacher understanding their serparate worlds. They seem to forever drift ... I mention some of the big named bands to my piano teacher ... he is clueless. I mention some well known classical composers to peers at school they are clueless. I believe that there is no bridging of classical and contemporary. They are two separate worlds to the student and teacher ...

With this topic ... really ... we are forever being told that classical is the music to listen to ... such class, such melody such a style is lost.
At the same time what if it were the other way around shouldnt classical lovers listen to rock, such energy and liveliness?
Music is organised sound
User avatar
Tranquillo
 
Posts: 465
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:43 pm

Postby Tranquillo » Fri Dec 21, 2007 5:54 am

Upon reading a book titled: the popular guide to classical music. I have realised that classical is still a large facet of music today.

All over movies - Romantic pieces, classical pieces,
impressionalistic pieces, etc they are all being played.

Popular Classical Pieces - Clair De Lune, Fur Elise, Moonlight Sonata, Beethoven's 5th Symphony are reconised

Semi - classical pieces/songs are out there - Take phantom of the opera . It has coloratura parts in it candenzas, its sang with classical vocals

Cartoons - a form of media where classical music is popular. (Tom & Jerry's cat concerto)

Popular Classical Icons - André Rieu - the violinist, popular classical violinist

We live in a world were classical still exists but with other music. Youths may be stero typical of classical music and say that they dont like classical because it is too 'serious'but they are constantly being exposed to it. They may not have appreciative ears for 'hardcore' classical but I suppose that is a gradual journey.

Just the other day at my school, I sang the song 'think of me'from phantom of the opera. It was half classical - hald muisical theatre - people did seem to have no appreciation during the song, some conversed during the whole thing. HOWEVER when I got to the candenza at the end - with virtuosity and hitting Bb two octaves above middle C with out a mic in a large hall that woke them up. They appreciated it and were amazed.
Watching a young boy play Lizst's hungarian rhapsody and seeing his nifty fingers race up and down the keys crossing over each other many were in awe.

Maybe they cant bear to listen to a Mozart Concerto yet ... they arent ready but ... in time they will be ... Well that is my earnest hope. It is a gradual journey and we are 'eduacating' them.
Music is organised sound
User avatar
Tranquillo
 
Posts: 465
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:43 pm

Previous

Return to Piano Methods Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron