How much non-teaching time do you work?

Talk with other teachers, exchange tips, participate in polls regarding a teaching studio business

Postby pianoannie » Fri Nov 05, 2004 11:23 pm

Lyndall's comment in another thread hit home with me, as I (like her) have been trying to think of ways to reduce my non-teaching work hours, without reducing my quality of teaching. I do tend to go "above and beyond," doing lots of creative things in my studio, but it's time for me to do some serious examination of the hours I spend and their actual direct benefit to my student's progress and/or motivation.

Does anyone here keep track of hours spent working on a weekly basis? It would be very interesting to "compare notes" so to speak. I have never tracked my hours in the past, but hope to start doing that soon, at least for a while. Maybe I'll post my results in a few weeks.

I'm guessing that, for every hour I teach, I spend at least a half hour on other tasks related to teaching. If I include time spent at piano teacher sites like this, it would be even more.
Some of my work includes:

Review student pieces, develop teaching strategies.
Plan 5 recitals per year (extra trips to music store to select recital pieces, secure location, type programs, arrange refreshments, purchase paper supplies and decorations, hire photographer, additional lessons with students for extra prep).
Extra lessons (no additional charge) for students prior to competitions.
Monthly email newsletters
Bookkeeping
Local piano teacher organization meetings
Piano teacher workshops at local piano stores
Research for info regarding particular teaching challenges (ie cerebral palsy student; transfer student weaknesses; gifted students, etc).
Make worksheets to help particular students.
Make music games and teaching aids (ie giant floor mat grand staff, note-finder, rhythm cards, rhythm instrument pattern posters).
Trips to office store for supplies and photocopying.
Weekly update of my announcement board.
Keep studio scrapbook organized.
Keep studio organized and clean.
Plan student contests (make student score sheets, buy prizes, make motivational posters for studio related to contest).
Interview/intro lesson for prospective students
3-4 student performance parties/group classes per year (plan games, develop lesson plans for that year's teaching focus for group classes, purchase prizes and paper goods for party).
Read teacher magazines (Clavier, Keyboard Companion, teacher newsletters from Faber, Schaum, Hal Leonard).
Read various books for piano teachers
Browse piano music catalogs, place orders for students as well as my lending library.
Regularly review my lending library and inventory of books to plan for supplements to students' method books.
Phone calls or emails to parents to discuss concerns.
Mail cards of encouragement to students.
Purchase Christmas gifts for each student.
My own piano lessons and practice time to continue developing my skills.

Well, there's probably more, but that's what comes to mind.
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Sat Nov 06, 2004 10:37 am

Dear Pianoannie:

I often get an uplift from the Forum and you just provided another one, simply by listing the things that a dedicated professional does without a second thought in order to offer her students the best possible service. You have no idea how many 'teachers' I've known who do nothing at all to improve their own knowledge and skills or their students' growth, beyond sitting in the lesson time and pasting the same old method and repertoire, using the same old cliches, on every kid who shows up.

I've made a bet with myself that when you get all the statistics together concerning how many non-teaching hours you spend, look at it in dismay, and resolve to pare down some activities and be more efficient, you'll end up not changing a thing.

Thanks for a good day.

Bill Leland.
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sat Nov 06, 2004 11:57 am

Dr. Bill Leland wrote:I've made a bet with myself that when you get all the statistics together concerning how many non-teaching hours you spend, look at it in dismay, and resolve to pare down some activities and be more efficient, you'll end up not changing a thing.

Dr. Leland's and pianoannie's comments are well-taken, but let me add another viewpoint. I think of piano teachers as professionals; I think most piano teachers do, too. I'm a scientific professional, and, like piano teachers, I spend a great deal of time on things that I'm not paid for (reading professional journals to stay up on current science, talking on the phone with clients, attending scientific meetings, traveling generally, answering e-mail from clients, etc., etc.). I view these as "costs of doing business." As I see it, the problem is not one of being paid directly for absolutely every minute I spend on work-related stuff, but, rather, making sure that I get paid in a manner appropriate to my level of knowledge and talent.

Here's what I mean by that. If the average person with a Ph.D. in the sciences makes X amount (including employer paid benefits) for what they do, then I feel that I should make at least that, since I have special knowledge and a record of accomplishment that most others don't have. In return, I have to accept the idea that I'm not working an hourly paid job where every minute I spend is directly paid.

Piano teachers would be well-advised to think of it in the same way, as professionals. There are some unavoidable costs of doing any business, but the teacher should be able to make a living wage, including the cost of providing benefits - not because it's an entitlement, but because it's necessary for the teacher to continue to stay in the business of providing lessons. Anything less than that is simply unrealistic for both the teacher and the student considering taking lessons from the teacher. If piano teachers don't feel that they make enough money, the solution is not to try to find a way to charge every minute of time, but, rather, to set their lesson fees at a level which realistically reflects their training, time and commitment to providing the best in lessons. :)
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Postby pianoannie » Sat Nov 06, 2004 12:26 pm

Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Editor wrote:If piano teachers don't feel that they make enough money, the solution is not to try to find a way to charge every minute of time, but, rather, to set their lesson fees at a level which realistically reflects their training, time and commitment to providing the best in lessons. :)

My point wasn't really about trying to charge for every minute of time per se, but as you say, to set fees which offer adequate compensation for the numerous non-teaching hours we do work. I'll have to admit when I typed out that list of tasks in my post above, I was rather shocked! That's a lot of time-consuming tasks! No wonder I feel like I work fulltime even though I have just 25 students!

At the risk of derailing my own thread, I'm going to copy/paste something I recently posted on another piano teaching website. It's very relevant to what John just said. Hopefully we'll steer ourselves back to the topic of how many hours other members here put into their preparations for lessons.

<<<<<<I think the problem lies partly in the fact that the people doing the teaching are adults who need to earn a decent living, but teaching anything one-on-one is not a cost-effective way for a child to learn. Most parents aren't able/willing to pay a truly "adult wage" for an activity for their child.

By "adult wage" I mean a wage that, after expenses, health insurance premiums, self-employment taxes are taken out (and taking into account non-teaching working hours), is an amount that a person could actually live well on.

Think about a computer consultant, plumber, home decorating consultant, personal tax accountant, or other occupation in which the worker gets paid for a particular amount of time, during which they are working for a single customer. It is not unusual for a customer to pay $100 an hour (or more) for such services. And I assume that most customers realize that the worker is not "earning" $100/hour. We realize, for example, that the plumber is not actually under sinks making repairs 40 hours a week. And since we need a plumber (or accountant or computer consultant) only on an occasional basis, we cough up whatever the charge is and accept it as a fact of life.

But for piano lessons? Many families have 2 or 3 or more kids to put in lessons, and that's an expense that's going to be every week, year after year. Obviously very few families could pay $100/hour to a piano teacher. Or even $50/hour. Or, imo, any amount that's going to truly end up being a decent yearly salary for a professional adult.

Can you imagine how costly a school would be if the teacher:student ratio was 1:1? It's out of the question! That's why schools have 20, 30, or more students in a classroom. Unless you're ultra-rich, a child's education could not be done via private tutoring.

But that's the way most of us want to teach piano. I've tried the group thing. It's not how I prefer to teach piano. And it's not the way most parents want their children to learn piano.

So we come back to the need for an "adult wage" versus the inability of most people to actually pay it for their children in private piano lessons. This is something I've really been putting thought into lately. Your thoughts?
>>>>>>>
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sat Nov 06, 2004 1:06 pm

pianoannie wrote:At the risk of derailing my own thread, I'm going to copy/paste something I recently posted on another piano teaching website. It's very relevant to what John just said. Hopefully we'll steer ourselves back to the topic of how many hours other members here put into their preparations for lessons.



"So we come back to the need for an "adult wage" versus the inability of most people to actually pay it for their children in private piano lessons. This is something I've really been putting thought into lately. Your thoughts? "

The quotation is very apropos for this topic, but also illustrates the problem I see with piano teachers' view of things. Why should people be willing to pay a golf pro anywhere from $75 to $300 per hour for private golf lessons? Why should they be willing to spend a $100 a month on a cell phone for their kids to carry, but not on piano lessons? Why do people spend the time and money that they do to have their kids participate in sports? None of these are any more "necessary" than piano lessons, but many of the same people who won't think twice about spending money in these other ways, will complain about lesson costs, irrespective of the price. It's not that people can't afford lessons, even at a higher price, it's that some of them don't value the lessons highly.

I could go on with this recitation, but it points up what I've already said in another PEP forum: piano teachers simply don't value themselves and their talents enough. The problem lies just as much with teachers as with their students. If lesson fees are set at realistic levels, those who don't value them enough to succeed in them will decide not to take lessons, thereby saving everybody a lot of consternation.

I know that I've phrased a complex situation in very simplified terms to highlight what I see as some important issues. I know that not every qualified student can afford every fee level. But think of it this way: if I decide that I can't afford to pay a golf pro his full fee, does that mean that he should reduce it so I can afford it? I think he would probably laugh in my face at such a proposition. Why should piano teachers be treated any differently?

I think it's very valuable to discuss all the things teachers do that they don't get directly reimbursed for, even though the people who ought to read it, i.e. students and parents, probably don't read this forum. Such a discussion serves to point out to everybody what good teachers do - and what poor teachers fail to do. :)
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Postby pianoannie » Sat Nov 06, 2004 2:11 pm

Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Editor wrote:Why should people be willing to pay a golf pro anywhere from $75 to $300 per hour for private golf lessons? Why should they be willing to spend a $100 a month on a cell phone for their kids to carry, but not on piano lessons? Why do people spend the time and money that they do to have their kids participate in sports? None of these are any more "necessary" than piano lessons, but many of the same people who won't think twice about spending money in these other ways, will complain about lesson costs, irrespective of the price. It's not that people can't afford lessons, even at a higher price, it's that some of them don't value the lessons highly.


But think of it this way: if I decide that I can't afford to pay a golf pro his full fee, does that mean that he should reduce it so I can afford it? I think he would probably laugh in my face at such a proposition. Why should piano teachers be treated any differently?

John, you raise some interesting points! And spoken like a confident businessman! Perhaps you're right, maybe I haven't been placing enough value on my services and my training and my time.

I have often considered the students that I have, many of whom sacrifice to pay for lessons as it is. But when I think of what you said about golf pros, and that if you couldn't afford his fees, you certainly wouldn't expect him to lower his fee! Put that way, it makes perfect sense!

I'm thnking that as long as there are teachers who are willing to teach for $8 or $10 a lesson, the pay scale will be held down for all of us. But perhaps not.

So....just to play with the numbers, let's say I want to earn $60K/year (not exactly upperclass, but far above what I now earn). Throw in $1000/month for health, dental, vision insurance. Many employers contrbute 5% or so to 401K, so there's another $3000 per year. Add it all up, and I need to earn $75K/year. But I need to cover teaching expenses, so I'll round it up to $80K per year, or $6667 per month.
I could conceivably teach 40 students, 45 minutes per lesson, which is 30 teaching hours weekly. Assume another 15-20 hours of non-teaching work, for a pretty full work week.
(I am actually calculating all of this as I go. I don't know what the lessons will cost yet---let's continue as I find out!)

For me to earn $6667/month from 40 students, I need to charge $167/month per student. Hmmm....sounds high compared to what I'm accustomed to teachers charging, but coming back to the golf pro example, it sounds pretty affordable!!

Now....we just have to find a way to convince piano teachers everywhere to charge a decent "adult wage." John, do you think it is actually possible for most good teachers to fill their studios with rates that high? I do think I deserve it every bit as much as a golf instructor or plumber, but I don't know how to go about getting to that point!! Especially when there are teachers within minutes of me who charge very low fees, and teachers who come into the schools who charge $10/lesson.
I suppose it would require some effective advertising, which Bill brought up recently.

At least I am getting some ideas of where I'd like to be, and realizing that it's not unreasonable for me to want to earn a genuine living teaching piano. Thanks for the encouragement!!
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sat Nov 06, 2004 2:53 pm

pianoannie wrote:But I need to cover teaching expenses, so I'll round it up to $80K per year, or $6667 per month.
I could conceivably teach 40 students, 45 minutes per lesson, which is 30 teaching hours weekly. Assume another 15-20 hours of non-teaching work, for a pretty full work week.
(I am actually calculating all of this as I go. I don't know what the lessons will cost yet---let's continue as I find out!)

For me to earn $6667/month from 40 students, I need to charge $167/month per student. Hmmm....sounds high compared to what I'm accustomed to teachers charging, but coming back to the golf pro example, it sounds pretty affordable!!

Now....we just have to find a way to convince piano teachers everywhere to charge a decent "adult wage." John, do you think it is actually possible for most good teachers to fill their studios with rates that high? I do think I deserve it every bit as much as a golf instructor or plumber, but I don't know how to go about getting to that point!! Especially when there are teachers within minutes of me who charge very low fees, and teachers who come into the schools who charge $10/lesson.
I suppose it would require some effective advertising, which Bill brought up recently.

My wife teaches special ed at the local high school. I would think that her fully loaded salary (including the cost of employer paid benefits) is somewhere in the neigborhood of $60K, reasonably high for New Mexico. So your number seems a little high to me but well within reason. Using your $167/mo/student number and assuming that you teach weekly half hour lessons, that means you have to earn about $40 per half hour lesson. That's more than most piano teachers make. I don't think, however, that that means it's too high.

I said in my earlier post that I realized that I was oversimplifying a number of things in these discussions. The most obvious one is the one you pointed out, that other teachers may not be convinced to charge a decent wage and you have to compete in the "market." Can you convince them? Probably not right away anyway. Does that mean you have to do nothing about YOUR fees. NO!.

I think the best way to deal with it is to slowly raise your rates, making sure that they stay within the local range of rates but are on the upper end of them. Since you are obviously a competent and dedicated teacher, you can easily justify being in the upper end of the range. As you raise your rates, other teachers will eventually do so, too. From everything I've seen and heard from teachers over the years, it just doesn't work out, or make much sense, to be on the low end of the fee range. If you're at $15 per half hour lesson now, you might consider going to $20 next semester and to $25 after a couple more and so forth. You may never get to the numbers you quoted, but at a minimum, you'll keep up with or even gain a little on inflation. Anyway, as I said earlier, I can't comment on the local market conditions where you live, but if you have a full studio with a waiting list, your rates are probably too low.
:;):
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sat Nov 06, 2004 3:02 pm

pianoannie wrote:I do think I deserve it every bit as much as a golf instructor or plumber, but I don't know how to go about getting to that point!! Especially when there are teachers within minutes of me who charge very low fees, and teachers who come into the schools who charge $10/lesson.

One other comment: Think of the car business. You can buy a Hyundai for $12K or so or spend $45K for a Lexus or $70K for a BMW. Does that mean that Lexus and BMW are going bankrupt and that Hyundai is taking over? Of course not! Lexus and BMW are going great guns.

My point is that there are always people who are willing to pay extra for the highest quality and status - and even enjoy doing it. Go for that market and let those who want to go for the mass market do so. They will be happy and so will you! :D
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Postby pianoannie » Sat Nov 06, 2004 3:31 pm

Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Editor wrote:Using your $167/mo/student number and assuming that you teach weekly half hour lessons, that means you have to earn about $40 per half hour lesson. That's more than most piano teachers make. I don't think, however, that that means it's too high.

I was basing that on 45 minute lessons. I no longer offer 30 minutes lessons to new students enrolling. Right now I have only 4 students who still take 30-min lessons, and they know that I am phasing that option out.
I absolutely LOVE having most of my students for 45 minutes!!! We accomplish so much more each week, and I truly do see better progress! And I feel less stressed, from the pressure to "fit it all in" in only 30 minutes.

Anyway, $40 for 45 minutes is still on the high end for around here, and I know I can't have a huge increase all at once (and I wasn't even implying that $60K was actually my personal goal--just a number I arbitrarily chose).
But I do think that with some advertising I could increase the demand for my lessons. This is the first year that I actually got to the last name on my waiting list, so I currently have no prospective students to call if a rate increase caused anyone to drop out. In the past I have generally had 10 or more names on my waiting list. That's a nice feeling of security.
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sat Nov 06, 2004 4:52 pm

pianoannie wrote:This is the first year that I actually got to the last name on my waiting list, so I currently have no prospective students to call if a rate increase caused anyone to drop out. In the past I have generally had 10 or more names on my waiting list. That's a nice feeling of security.

Keep in mind that a goal (if not the goal) is to increase your income to a more reasonable level. If you lose 5% of your students, but increase your rates 25%, you're ahead of the game in both income and available time to do an even better job for your remaining students!




Edited By Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Editor on 1099781587
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sun Nov 07, 2004 12:10 pm

pianoannie wrote:I (like her) have been trying to think of ways to reduce my non-teaching work hours, without reducing my quality of teaching. I do tend to go "above and beyond," doing lots of creative things in my studio, but it's time for me to do some serious examination of the hours I spend and their actual direct benefit to my student's progress and/or motivation.

Getting back to the original intent of this thread, it seems to me that you are doing a tremendous amount for your students. You should be paid for that extra effort.

Beyond that, and as Dr. Leland already pointed out, after you examine what you do, you'll probably want to continue doing most, if not all, of it. If that's the case, then it really comes down to time management. I don't claim to be an expert in all aspects of that; I sometimes feel that I could use some coaching in time management. :laugh:

That said, here are some thoughts:

The single biggest thing all of us can do to better use our time is to organize our day as much as possible. Allocate time everyday for those things that must be done everyday, but only a certain amount. Only go over the allotted time for true emergencies. Make sure that your day includes time "just for you."

Make or return calls only at certain times of the day and only for so long. Ignore the phone outside that period. Where possible, use e-mail rather than phone calls, since you can ususally control the length of an e-mail better than the length of a phone conversation with a talkative parent.

Do all written studio communications by HTML e-mail, rather than printed newsletters, etc. You'll save both money on postage and paper and time on printing and posting them. Your students will get the document in minutes and they can just print it if they need hard copy. Print off a few copies yourself for the few people who don't have e-mail.

Consider employing one of your good students, perhaps in partial exchange for lessons, to help with some of the drudge work. This is a good use of your time and money and is a way for a prospective music student to see what running a teaching studio is really like.

Try to enlist the aid of some student parents to help with some of the recitals and contest preparations. There is no reason that I can see that you should bear both all the cost and the time penalties to do every last bit of this work. Not every parent will help and not every parent who does help will be available all the time, but I bet you can find some who will amongst your studio clients. The goal here is not to avoid work, per se, but to free up time to do what you do best - teach.

Try to get your local teachers association to publish an agenda for each meeting at least a week before the meeting (this is easily done by e-mail again). Then attend only those meetings where there is significant business or a program that particularly interests you. Of course, you may need and want the interaction you get with other teachers, but meeting attendance takes a good chunk of time, especially if you are really active.

These are just some general thoughts. Managing time is mostly a matter of discipline, just like practicing the piano.

:;):
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Sun Nov 07, 2004 12:52 pm

In my last post I was mostly offering a little cheerleading for the attitude and commitment shown by teachers like pianoannie, and wasn't really thinking about money at all. In fact it would be presumptious of me to offer any detailed advice about fees, since the great bulk of my teaching career has been in universities rather than in a private studio. I did make a general comment about my wife's success at it, but she'd have to fill in the details. So I've been getting a good education from this latest series of posts.

(And I'll tell you something else, while I'm at it: if you wanted a really extreme example of dedication and commitment you'd have to pick the brains of the Founding Editor of this site and get some inkling of the gargantuan amount of time and effort (let's not talk about personal expense) that he has put into this over the years--all for free.)

When all is said and done and calculated, there is no way to measure in economic terms the commitment we try to bring to teaching. A long time ago I read a book by the English theologian Dorothy L. Sayers, in which she pointed out the difference between "the artist and the ordinary worker". It was not meant as any put-down, but she said that the typical worker works for the by-product of his work, which is the money, while the artist "contrives to make money so that he may go on working." And in context it was understood that anyone can be an artist at anything, not just the Arts. I happen to have a wife, a daughter and a step-daughter--all teachers--who fit this category. The complaints they bring home are never about salary, insurance coverage or travel inconvenience, but always about some uncommitted student or somebody or something in the system that hinders them from doing their job more creatively. And that typifies the dedication I often hear in this forum.

So, again--hooray for you!!

Dr. Bill
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Postby 75-1095335090 » Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:53 pm

A lot of my non-teaching studio work happens at one of my part time jobs. I work in two bookstores, one of which is a bargain bookstore, with not a lot of work (no inventory to update, way less paperwork, fewer customers that want help... most like the challenge of finding things on their own... odd, that). Anyhow, I bring a laptop and do my lesson plans, newsletters, notes to parents, arrangements (I've got Finale on that laptop), and things like that.

It's a great situation... my boss knows what I'm doing and is supportive, and I get paid for some of my non-teaching studio work.

For other things, like bookkeeping, my own lessons and practice, and things I need my desktop computer for (we're making a CD this year... I'm still learning how to use the program that transfers the music from the piano to the computer... hopefully I'll understand that before I have to do it with a student. lol)... many of those things I am doing for my students AND for myself.

I'm taking lessons to improve my performance ability because I've been tired of being stuck at one level, but I've also been improving my teaching skills at the same time. I got the piano that comes with the software to make your own CDs because I want to make CDs of my own music.... AND it makes a nice draw for students who don't like playing in recitals, but still want their family to hear them play.

While I'm not getting paid for most of those things, I can claim them as a business expense, so it's not a total loss.

I think that music teachers differ from golf pros and plumbers in that we're not just in it for the teaching (although, that's usually a huge part of it). Teaching isn't just our job. Music is such a part of our life that it'd be easier to lose an arm than lose the music. While I'm sure there are many passionate plummers out there, I wonder how many of them spend their free time with pipes and routers?

All of that being said, I believe I'm not charging enough for my lessons. My students, for the most part, can easily afford what I'm charging and wouldn't bat an eye at an increase. I have been slowly increasing my fees every year.

When I started I was charging $14 per half hour lesson. Then I went to $62 per month (or $15.50). Last year it was $64, and this year it's $68.

My piano lessons cost me $75 per month (half hour per week), and when I was taking bass guitar lessons earlier in the year it was $21.50 per half hour lesson. Both of these studios are in a different town, though. In my town, lessons run from around $15 per half hour, to around $18, in the studios. In the home studios it's anywhere from $8 to $25.
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Postby Lyndall » Sun Nov 07, 2004 7:58 pm

Somehow I missed this thread so I only just read Annie's list of non-teaching tasks and I have to say it is just about IDENTICAL to what I have been doing right down to the last item. I have never actually clocked how much time I spend on all this but I do know that if unchecked, I would be working on it ALL DAY before students arrive & also the minute they leave.

Recently though I started asking myself whether I'm really giving kids a better musical education than what I got growing up in a traditional studio without incentive programs, colorful posters, group lessons, newsletters, frequent recitals & other events, etc. etc. Maybe it's because of the culture kids today are living in - multimedia, more opportunities for extra-curricular activities, higher incomes, cell phones, video games - that we (think we) need to provide all this stimulation to inspire them.

What do you all think? Is it necessary to go this far, or do you think that maybe we could spend our time better without constantly seeking additional ideas to try to improve ourselves & our teaching??? I don't mean we do away with professional development, but rather make it more focused & more productive. Then we might not feel that we have to be compensated for all the extras we are giving.

I think it's just me, but I'm not sure that ALL my students benefit from the 'extras' I've been giving:-

* so many of them don't want incentives & couldn't care less about charts because they're too lazy (not motivated) to keep track of practice time/number of pieces memorized/ which scales they've mastered etc & their parents are far too busy to help them

* giving them so much supplemental music is distracting from the method books which lays the foundation for good technique

* most parents are not really that interested in how to actually help their children practice better or in other time-consuming tips that I include in my monthly newsletters

* most of the children & parents throw away the fancy recital programs I spend time designing & printing

* a lot of the 'research' I do is hard to put into practice because I have so many ideas that I find it hard to focus on one at a time (yes this a real problem for me - any ideas?)

* sometimes I feel the group lesson time is better spent giving private lessons esp. when it takes the place of the private lesson as students miss out on the one-on-one time to work on music (although they do get GREAT benefits from the group situation)


Sorry if all this sounds like a downer, but I really need your advice on whether I'm on the right track or not. I'm trying so hard to improve my teaching, but am thinking that all these extras are not actually helping but are instead distracting me from my real job. Dr. Ziegler mentioned time management which is what it boils down to I guess. My husband also suggested keeping track of my time - limiting my teaching-related activities & it's really made me try to prioritize.

I'm so glad this forum is available for serious discussion!

- Lyndall
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sun Nov 07, 2004 8:33 pm

Several of the posts in this thread lead to the interesting question: Just what are the absolute duties of a quality teacher and what other things, beyond duties, should a devoted teacher do for students? It seems to me that answering this question for your own situation will go a long way toward helping you prioritize your time and doing what matters most for your students. I don't know if any consensus can emerge for this, but at least some consideration of it should be valuable. :)
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
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