When performing...

Discuss the joys and pratfalls of performance

Postby pianogal » Sun Oct 14, 2007 3:28 pm

Which one do you think is more important when performing/competing?

emotions (dynamic...),
notes (no mistake...), or
posture/action (bow, body movement with the music...)

In other word, which one is these is what the judges most looking for?
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 15, 2007 12:55 am

I think the judge is looking for expressive techniques. Touch and style ... like a minuet ... taken from the name 'menu' meaning small danity steps. Its a dance in 3/4 ... it is meant to sound graceful ... you may put dynamics in then ... but you dont want to go too heavy or overdone to loose the graceful touch. - I have been told by my teacher if you play it piano all the way ... with no forte ... but still keep the graceful mood you get the judges approval but if you add overdone dynamics and loose the touch and dont capture the mood then that is where marks are lost.
I can say the say applies for periods and style. Bach had real expressive music. However his music is of the Baroque period... a person has to watch out not to put too many dynamics in so one does not get out of style.

I would say it is capturing the mood, applying expressive techniques ... understanding the genré, the period, application of detail really just CAPTURING THE MOOD
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Postby Stretto » Tue Oct 16, 2007 11:38 am

One thing that was always written on my critique sheets in college juries by one particular prof. was:

"Try to be more lyrical - less deliberate". That ties into what's been said by Becibu.
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Postby Tarnia » Fri Oct 19, 2007 8:19 pm

Interesting...I would consider 'touch and style' to be part of emotion, given the 3 'categories' above.
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Postby Stretto » Mon Oct 22, 2007 6:30 am

The word style reminded me also, they may be looking for the piece to be in keeping with the style of the time period. That's another thing written on my critiques: "perhaps if you listened to more of that composer's style . . . "
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Postby pianogal » Mon Oct 22, 2007 4:04 pm

Basically, the "style" is the "understanding" of the composer/music
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 22, 2007 10:51 pm

Stretto wrote:One thing that was always written on my critique sheets in college juries by one particular prof. was:

"Try to be more lyrical - less deliberate". That ties into what's been said by Becibu.

Seems we have similarties... the last exam I had ... there was a comment on having that graceful touch and quality ... (since I was playing it mathematically) ... I needed to shape and stylize the piece ...
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Postby pianogal » Tue Oct 23, 2007 5:14 pm

I hope it's not a dumb question.........well, I already feel stupid now......... :D
What are the exams you are talking about?
I don't think I've ever taken any exam...
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Postby Tarnia » Wed Oct 24, 2007 9:05 am

Different countries have organizations that set up an evaluation system for music students. In Canada, it is the Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM), and their grading system runs from introductory-ARCT, ARCT being a teaching diploma. The 'exams' exist in two parts-practical exams (technique, sight reading, ear training, playing your chosen pieces from each required time period) and equivalent theory exams (preliminary-gr. 5 I think). The two exams are taken separately, and some choose to just do one or the other, but that is neither here nor there. I think Becibu said Australia was similar. Anyways, what is being discussed above are examiner's comments on the playing of the requisite pieces at an examination :;): Hope that helps!
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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Oct 25, 2007 9:30 pm

Keep in mind that exams is formalised way allowing students to gain reconition of what grade/ability they can play. Students get a certificate for passing the exam. (getting A B C ) (d is a fail).
Exams take place with an examiner (at a certain time every year... can be more if you book more) that is unknown to the student (a complete stranger) however very qualified in his/her work.
Read the last few posts to get the idea if you still dont get it dont feel hesitant to ask!




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Postby Tranquillo » Sun Oct 28, 2007 11:15 pm

I did post a topic under the young students forums ... hopefully that would help
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Postby Tarnia » Mon Oct 29, 2007 5:50 pm

Ok, so still rather 'not happy' at not doing so great on my gr 10 exam, but I will add my examiner's comments to the general consensus:

-technique-MORE FLUENCY/FLOW (I knew that, I did not perform those well that day :p)
-My first study: needs more spirit, momentum, sweep and flexibility.
-Second study: some contrasts of tone are heard. Now aim for a fuller, broader expression overall. Buildup is rather insecure.
-Bach P+F in D+: need more energy and momentum (I interpret this to mean I did not play it in the style/mode of the composer). Fugue aim for more rhythmic authority and exactness throughout.

Ok, don't feel like embarrassing myself further ;) Overall, while I did have some notational errors/rhythmic insecurities, the majority of the comments were on the flow, energy/momentum, style, contrasts, and emotional colour. The examiner did mention I need to perfect my technique and re-examine my choice of tempi in my pieces.

The impression I got, both from these comments and comments on previous audtions/exams, are that the technique and correct notation are expected at the competition level. While it is understood that everyone is nervous and some mistakes happen, it depends how well you can carry off the piece. I think overall flow, style and emotion can cover for the odd notational error. However, all the emotion in the world isn't going to cover for a lack of finesse with a piece. I see all that (style, mode, emotion, momentum, colour, ocntrast) as part of 'emotion', but whatever you call it, I think it is what makes or breaks a piece.
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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Dec 27, 2007 3:48 pm

Perfomance flair is another thing. Keep in mind not at all to get out of style but to make the piece your own and to perform with great quality.
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