Favorite classical period of music - Vote for your favorite classical period

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Favorite classical period of music - Vote for your favorite classical period

Baroque
0
No votes
Classical
2
29%
Romantic (both early and late)
4
57%
Contemporary
1
14%
 
Total votes : 7

Postby 97-1128742375 » Wed Oct 12, 2005 7:49 pm

hello everybody! :D
I just was wondering what sort of era of classical music most people liked.
Mine is the Romantic era.
Can't wait to see the results! :laugh:
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Postby Stretto » Thu Oct 13, 2005 12:42 pm

Sorry I couldn't vote because there isn't any one era I like over the other. There are certain things I like about each era. I'm kind of glad we have the advantage of being able to choose to play something out of any of those era's we please. It may get a little old if all we had to choose from is only Baroque, or only Classical, etc. - gives us more variety and I'm a big advocate of variety. I'm glad you asked this question because I've never thought of it before but it just dawned on me poor Bach never had the pleasure of playing or studying the style of Mozart, or Bartok. Poor Mozart never had the pleasure of playing Chopin, etc., etc. I really never thought about it that way - wow! - to think we have a musical advantage somehow over those master composers - having so much more variety in at our fingertips - that's a new insight for me! :D (By the way, I used to not even realize that the music of Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Bartok, etc. was categorized into eras like this. I always thought it was all just called classical music. I never knew there was Baroque, Romantic, etc. Now when I am referring to the music of all the composers in all the era's in one lump sum, I'm never sure if I say "classical" music to someone if they will think I mean the classical era of Mozart, Haydn, etc. or if I mean all of the composers from all these eras. Does anyone else ever feel this way?)

appassionata,
What do you like about the Romantic era? What makes it your favorite? What are you favorite composers of this era? How did you learn about the different eras? Did you learn them in lessons? I would like to teach my students a little about how it's all broken down. Thanks for the great question.
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Postby 97-1128742375 » Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:26 pm

l really like the Romantic era because of how expressive and how interesting the music is.
My favorite composer (in the era and of all composers) is Chopin. I really like his music.
I learned a lot about the periods in music from my lessons. As I would learn a piece, my teacher would give me background information about the composer and the era of music he/she belonged to. She's a great teacher!
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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:58 am

ROMANTIC! Definatly... such time of freedom and expression such pianists of awe! :)
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Postby pianogal » Sat Sep 29, 2007 6:59 pm

Boy, I don't know....I like all four of them!
Baroque musics have freedom for me to create my own dynamics.
Classical musics are pretty fun, fast, slow......
Romantic musics are relaxing, beautiful..........
Contemporary musics are very different from others.
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Postby Tranquillo » Sat Sep 29, 2007 7:33 pm

Pianogirl I dont get it ... with Baroque thought you can experience different daynamic but you must watch out not to get out of style ...
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Postby pianogal » Sat Sep 29, 2007 8:57 pm

Well, yes, but there are still much more places for you to fill your own creation than other types.
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Sun Sep 30, 2007 4:04 pm

By any chance, would the greater freedom in Baroque music be in terms of ornamentation (trills etc.), while in Romantic music it's rubato and more emotional type of expressiveness? What type of interpretation do you add to Baroque music, Pianogal? Becibu, for the Romantic? (I'm just at the beginning of my education in these things)



Edited By pianissimo on 1191189863
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:56 am

Yes, that was what I was reffering to the freedom of expression and emotion in Romantic music is evident.

Beethoven had lessons with Haydn and Haydn found him to be stubborn due to the fact that he did not follow structures. One example is 'sonata form' this is evident in his 'moolight sonata in first movement often fast slow fast ... the first movement was slow ... it didnt have a recapitalization and other parts in a conventional sonata. Critics percieve it more as a nocturne than a sonata.

Because of this maverick attitude Beethoven had in the classical period this brought a beginning to the romantic period where composers were free not having form and structure in their melody, instead they were able to communicate their music and express themselves and convey emotion into their playing.

I think what pianogal was saying is that in the Baroque era since the pianoforte was not yet invented and we only have the harsichord and organ there are no dynamics. By this there is the ability to experiment, to add in crescendos, decrescendos, etc. However having said that there is a warning and that is to not get ovely ut of style.

Bach had highly expressive pieces as a composer and despite this limit to dynamics he still had expression but there is still the ability to experiement with dynamics since the piano is now an instrument in out day!
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:46 am

Thank you for the info., Becibu. It was surprising to see Baroque and Romantic music juxtaposed as each being seen as given to creativity more than the other. That's what got me thinking. I have the impression that our interpretation in modern times rides on creating emotion, impressions, and stories or pictures. That's what we think of and it's all we think of. We do rubato, let the music ebb and swell, slow down, emphasize dynamically, and composers writing music do the same.

But it dawned on me that the older period had a different kind of creativity: intellectual and formal, and even demanded it. Musicians had to have a thorough knowledge of music and were expected to add embellishments such as mordents, trills. Not everything was written in. Someone gained a new respect for old music by seeing a score for the harpsichord, on which notes do not sustain. The progression from note to note was there, but the harpsichordist was expected to fill in notes in between so that there would be enough movement to keep the sound going. That required creativity, plus a thorough grounding in the rules of music in order to be creative with those notes, as well as keeping within the rules. There is the famous story of Bach having an improvisation contest in a church in a strange city, and when the local organist "lost", having said "I must have been playing against the famous Bach." It would seem that it was expected of musicians to be able to improvise. That's an intellectual creative pursuit, rather than emotional expression. But if someone were to try to be expressive in the romantic manner in Baroque music, that would be wrong. Come to think of it, changing the notes around, adding notes between the notes of a modern piece would also seem strange.
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:16 pm

Thats very interesting yes the older period did demand expressivness in other forms.
That improvisational quality is very interesting. As far as I know the first job that Bach had was to be a church organist. During that time he improvised a lot in the organ and then got fired from his job because of this. However having said that Candanzas were a common feature in Baroque music.

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