How big of a piano would sound good in this room?

Learn about pianos and how to maintain them

Postby Beckywy » Mon Feb 07, 2005 11:17 pm

I'm building my studio..the room is 10ft by 16ft with 10ft ceilings. How big of a grand piano would I be able to fit in there and still sound great? Should I go for a baby grand or a 5'10'' grand? My walls are wood panelling with wood floors. I also have a 52" upright that will be going in there as well.
"The real purpose of studying music-to unite ourselves with our special gifts in such a way that one would add strength to the other" Seymour Bernstein
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Tue Feb 08, 2005 1:58 pm

Becky, I always recommend strongly that serious musicians stay away from baby grands (smaller than 5'7" or 5'8"), because there's so much compromise in the string lengths and soundboard size. A ten-foot ceiling would make a 6' or 7' piano sound great--take a look at the Steinway L (5'11") or the Yamaha C3 (6'), or even Steinway B (6'11") or Yamaha C7 (7'4"--I have two of them).

I know it's a lot of money.......????

Dr. Bill.
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Postby 80-1107978580 » Thu Feb 10, 2005 12:30 pm

I agree with not going less than 6' for a grand. even though your room is not very big. If the sound is too much for the room, you can do wonders with rugs, carpet, drapes, and even book shelves.

Also, play a number of different brands: Playel, Petrof, Estonia, S&S, Kawai, Yamaha, etc. You might find one sounds more suitable for your space.
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Thu Feb 10, 2005 3:15 pm

Absolutely--piano purchase should take a lot of time. Be aware too, that a piano will sound quite different at home than in the showroom, which will inevitably have a bigger space, higher ceiling, and many more reflective surfaces such as a bare floor, etc. I've known several people who were disappointed that their new piano sounded 'dead' when they got it home. Usually it's just a matter of getting used to it, but you need to be aware of this.

Dr. Bill L.
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Postby Beckywy » Thu Feb 10, 2005 4:45 pm

I'm more partial to Kawai. I heard Petrof is only a low to mid end of pianos. Yamahas are very bright to me, and Steinways tend to have a heavier touch...I think.
"The real purpose of studying music-to unite ourselves with our special gifts in such a way that one would add strength to the other" Seymour Bernstein
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Fri Feb 11, 2005 9:16 am

No, I don't think it's true about Steinway touch--where did you get that? You could have played one that was out of regulation.

What Steinways really DO have is a heavier price!

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Postby 80-1107978580 » Fri Feb 11, 2005 1:00 pm

(I misspelled Pleyel before).

Petrofs are medium priced European pianos - about the same price as Estonias, although Estonias may price themselves in the higher range soon.

S&S do not necessarily have a heavy action. Depends on the regulation, as Dr. Leland said.
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