Piano exams ... grades - Who does piano exams?ameb,royal conser,

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Postby Tranquillo » Sat Sep 08, 2007 5:35 am

I am a piano student in Australia exams here are taken by many students. Many students do grades. Just wondering if anybody does do piano exams if so, which board? Oh and if you dont mind stating which county - (I heard that exams arent real big in other countries)

(Trinity College London (TCL)
Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM)
Australia Music Examination Board (AMEB)
Australia New Zealand Cultral Arts (ANZCA)...
Royal Conservatory of Music Canada (RCM)
etc)

I do AMEB exams and live in Australia :;):




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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Sep 10, 2007 12:27 am

So nobody does grades? (you can state that you dont do grades too)
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Mon Sep 10, 2007 11:19 am

So nobody does grades? (you can state that you dont do grades too)

Well I do, sort of ... but officially I'm a violin student who has picked up piano again ... and my violin went all over the place so the grade isn't sure anymore. I did the RCM rudimentary intermediate theory exam a few weeks ago. Oh, and I'm not a young student: I'm a rather old student with adult children.

If I can still fit in the box to answer your question though: Canada has the RCM (Royal Conservatory). I think there's and RCM in Great Britain (?) and elsewhere, but don't know if they have the same program and standards. I did read though, before doing the theory exam, that exam time and date have to be the same "all over the world".




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Postby Tranquillo » Fri Sep 14, 2007 7:41 pm

Thanks for letting me know. I have heard that in the states there is no grading system or examination board(s).

Not that this is a problem but a few international students that come to my highschool in Australia have had half their instruction not doing grades or doing grades.

I am intrigued to find out more as I tried to help a few but I can't fully understand the system in other countries. Pianissimo, is it common to undego exams in Canada, even so what grade does the level of examination go to?

Thanks again for letting me know.




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Postby 112-1182392787 » Tue Sep 18, 2007 9:40 pm

Not that this is a problem but a few international students that come to my highschool in Australia have had half their instruction not doing grades or doing grades.

I am intrigued to find out more as I tried to help a few but I can't fully understand the system in other countries. Pianissimo, is it common to undergo exams in Canada, even so what grade does the level of examination go to?

How does that work in Australia? Is that "grades" in private lessons, and is there some kind of national standard regardless of which teacher or system? Or within high school?

Not everyone would undergo the exam. The theory exams earn high school credits, and I would have gotten one for passing if I were still that age. Students being taught under any system can take the exams. I know a music major who did not do the exams while in high school, but got more than enough theory in the school program. The people doing the exam with my all looked like they were in their late teens.

I don't know how the grade levels translate. When you reach a certain grade with your instrument, you have to do the theory exam along with the practical. There are three grades of rudiments, then three harmony, counterpoint, advanced harmony, analysis and finally the teacher's ARCT written - also history. The intermediate rudiments I just wrote had intervals, chords, transposing, an assortment of types of scales; advanced rudiments adds simple cadences, transposing non-concert pitch instruments, and identifying chords occuring in given keys. Does that help translate any of this into a "grade"?
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Postby Tranquillo » Wed Sep 19, 2007 6:43 am

WOW!
It sounds indeed very different see how it works in Australia with (AMEB) ... the teacher is a member or accredided (somehow involved) in the Board. There is a certain syllabus with AMEB that the teacher must follow through in order that the student passes the exam. The Exam is taken often once a year normally (some teachers squeeze in two depending on the student).
The grade givern or result when a exam is done is in the form of A or B or C or D ...

With me still?

But with the grade level I am talking about Peliminary, Grade 1 , Grade 2 .. etc ... In Australia it goes up to 8 then there is something called A mus and L mus ... (piano diploma certificates).

With Peliminary it is like the kindergarten of piano basically begginer then the grades go higher. With grade 8 quite advanced.

With school credits really exams have nothing to do with schooling private lessons are another world to school. Having said that because a lot of young kids are begineers most sit the pelimnary exams. However because adult begineers are popular ... some take exams too. Exams are a formalised way of identifying ability . For exampe person can play at - eg. Grade 5 ... C - pass ... This shows that this person is an intermidiate pianist and passed with a C.

Hope I made sense thanks of letting me know.




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Postby 112-1182392787 » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:29 am

I'm still trying to understand this completely. Does that mean that every private music teacher must be part of the AMEB program? Or do some choose to teach outside of it, but the student would not receive official recognition for what he has done? Here it's a choice. If I want to take part in the RCM program I must have a teacher who is registered with the RCM, and there is a syllabus to be followed. What AMEB grade level would you think the intermediate rudiments I described might be in your system? Here it is called grade 2 and must be done before I think the grade 6 or 7 instrumental exam. The highest theory exam grade is 5, after which the teacher's exam comes. The people writing the exam with me seemed to be late teens. Grades are in percentage. Mine is easy to translate: it had to be A because I'm still slack jawed that I got 100%. So much for older people shedding brain cells like dandruff, which apparently is the prevailing theory.

The RCM is not associated with the public school system in any way. However, the theory curriculum has been recognized by the public school system, so that if a student passes a theory exam, he is also awarded a high school music credit as equivalent of having taken a semester course in music theory.

The RCM also upgraded its program last year. I had to study a slew of new material that wasn't in the old book and curriculum: they added less traditional scales such as blues and whole tone, additional chord types, hybrid meter, and other things, and the main theory book received a corresponding overhaul. It's lovely to discover this two weeks before the exam and try cram.

It also seems to be international, since the date confirmation stressed that dates and times are set internationally, and cannot be changed. Extremely formal with sealed envelopes and the rest.
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Postby LK123 » Wed Sep 19, 2007 2:09 pm

I just finished my Grade 9 piano in June with RCM, and am starting the work on the grade 10. However, the syllabus is changing as of 2008 and the technical requirements are apparantly going to change - adding more at an earlier grade. There are already huge leaps in what is required technically between certain grades so I don't know if revamping the syllabus will address this or not. I guess I will find out!
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Wed Sep 19, 2007 2:15 pm

There are already huge leaps in what is required technically between certain grades so I don't know if revamping the syllabus will address this or not.
Do you mean there are leaps in the technical requirements that existed before, and the ones that exist now? Or between the grades, period? I am going back to doing technical exams after a break of several years so this interests me. I bought the syllabus, but it's violin, not piano, so that doesn't help here.
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Postby Tranquillo » Wed Sep 19, 2007 4:33 pm

Hrmmmm

I'm still trying to understand this completely. Does that mean that every private music teacher must be part of the AMEB program? Or do some choose to teach outside of it, but the student would not receive official recognition for what he has done?


No every single private music teacher does not have to be part of the AMEB music program ... but most do get involved. Yes some do chose to teach outside of it ... but they are just a small minority. Some dont teach according to the AMEB syllabus as some students choose not to do exams.

It seems there are many different exams offered with RCM. Its quite similar with AMEB there is practical -
Which involves
>technical work (scales, broken chords etc)

>three-four pieces prepared according to the candidates grade level,

>Sightreading (the candidate plays a piece that he/she has never seen before),

>Aural singing and clapping - harmonising at other grades

>General knowledge- being quizzed on terms like poco piu vivo, allegretto, legato, what the key signature is etc.

BUT ... there are also theory exams , the highest you can go here with theory is grade 7. IT ranges in the level of difficulty at grade 1 most of what is required is to know the tonal pattern of a major scale, how to transpose in different keys, what a crescendo is a decresendo ... later the level of difficulty gets harder.

When doing grade 4 practical it is MANDOTORY for the candidate to do grade 1 theory.

Practical and theory are two different exams however they do compliment each other.

If student does not sit an exam he/she does not have any formal recognition of his/her abiliy and knowledge.

And yes if I wanted to take part in an exam then I would find a registered AMEB teacher ... most are though so its like I dont need to look.

Are you on the same page as me?
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Wed Sep 19, 2007 5:03 pm

Same page? In which way?
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Postby Tranquillo » Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:47 pm

hahaha just using some slang... same page as in getting what I am saying? With me still?
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Wed Sep 19, 2007 10:13 pm

Ah, got it. I thought it might be that, but you might have been asking about an actual page. Anyway, I've looked up AMEB - it seems more extensive - and here's a link to the RCM RCM
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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Sep 20, 2007 12:30 am

Thanks for the link I looked it up. Cleared it up for me. I was just wondering with RCM can you skip to any grade you desire or do you have to do it in order: Grade 1, grade 2, Grade 3 ... etc ... If you fail the grade before do you have to do it again?
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Thu Sep 20, 2007 1:03 am

Well, I went straight into intermediate rudiments in theory. I know someone who did the grade 2 practical exam but not grade 1, so unless the rules have changed for instruments, it seems skipping is allowed.
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