School music vs private lessons - Difference and comparison

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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Oct 04, 2007 9:34 pm

Here in Australia music is taught in schools ... I am very sure that is the same in the states after watching many movies made in the states ... hehehe ...
Here in Australia the syllabus and content material is different to private lessons. Most teachers follow through to a grading system/ examination board in Australia the content set in the syllabus of the examination board is often focusing on a one on one basis.
It includes technical work - Scales, Appregios, etc
Aural work - Clapping, singing back,harmonising
Sightreading - Playing piece never seen
General Knowledge- Background on terms and
composers
Pieces - 3-4 pieces and extention pieces
are chosen and perfected
examiners look for detail and
musicallity
This is just the practical side ... there is also theory involved.

On the other hand school music is taught completly differntly.
From a performance side the student is to pick a song/piece and encouraged to play it in an ensemble.
Examiners look for musicailly, presentation (e.g. a singers stage persona) , preparation ...
Also students can take a compostion course and submit thier works as well as composition daries.
Musicology is taught and students learn to critically analyse, discuss and form their opinoun on their findings.
Aural requires students to have a musical knowledge on other genrés ... they are to anatate on what they are hearing and compare it to another song/piece they are hearing.

I hope I am making sense but I am curious to know how school music differs in the states and other countries ... I am interested to know how it is taught ...
So write away!
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:30 am

maybe I'll re-phrase ...
How is school music different to what happens in a studio setting ... besides the fact that it is more one on one. In terms of content what is taught how does it differ?

What do you enjoy more and what would you think should be introduced in school music ore in Private lessons?
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Postby Stretto » Mon Oct 08, 2007 2:07 pm

There are more "schools" becoming available in my area for learning piano. I wonder if parents or adult students may choose a facility to learn at over a private studio especially in someone's home due to the day and age we live, parents can't be as trusting of someone they don't know well - perhaps they feel safer in a music school at a facility. I've gotten most students by word of mouth from parents that know me well vs. via advertising - then it's also a matter of the student or family being a stranger to me if they call via an ad vs. someone I know referring them. I can see that as one advantage for music schools.
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 08, 2007 5:18 pm

Yes that is soo true there are institutions like that. Well here in Australia there are some places that have centres/companies with many many teachers teaching one on one in that centre. It may seem safe and like a bright idea but there are competitions within those institutions ... not a bad thing but private lessons should no way be competitive.
Also here in Australia the instituitions are flexible with hours ... due to the abudance in teachers ...
This is a good thing.
However having said that you dont get to 'pick' your teacher in that kind of a setting. The beauty of private lessons I always thought was the fact that you get to see the teacher if you are unhappy you can choose another.

Well thats all I have to say...
What I was initaially reffering to in the school setting was mainly the public school system ... Music is taught in schools ... ? are they? Well here in Australia they are taught in schools ... and the way it is taught differs to the way private lessons are taught.
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Postby pianogal » Sun Oct 14, 2007 3:23 pm

I joined band for a year, playing the marimba.

Fun part: playing all together with 40 other students, mistakes are unnoticable.

Not-so-good part:I learned a little throughout the year, not even close to how much I imporved from private lessons..........so I quit.
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 15, 2007 12:36 am

pianogal wrote:I joined band for a year, playing the marimba.

Fun part: playing all together with 40 other students, mistakes are unnoticable.

Not-so-good part:I learned a little throughout the year, not even close to how much I imporved from private lessons..........so I quit.

I always thought doing private lessons in additon to school would really be benefical.
There are different skills learnt and different perspectives and areas to understand.
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 29, 2007 10:58 pm

since there is not much of a response ... is music taught in schools as classes ...
in Australia we call high school year 7-12. I understand in the states there is Junior High from year 7-8 and senior from year 9-12 ... ?
During that period or even before that ... what we call primary school (elemetary school in the states?) is there and music taught? If so how is it taught and how much time or how many lessons do you have with a school situation per week ... ?




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Postby 112-1182392787 » Mon Nov 19, 2007 1:06 pm

When I went to school decades ago, music education was paltry. We did not even learn to read notes and there were no instruments in public school, only as an elective in high school.

My son graduated from an arts magnet school a few years ago, and that is different again. This school is 60% arts (music - strings, vocal, winds; visual arts; theatre arts; literature i.e. writers) , 40% local population, roughly. Students in the arts program got there by auditioning, and they come from a radius of around 100 miles. They must be recommended by their private teachers and of course only a percentage of those who audition can be admitted. Music teachers must also be performing professional musicians and the standards are high. A proportion of the students who begin in the arts program drop out of the program but may continue in the school's normal program, still doing music etc. When a student is admitted, both parent and student must sign an agreement that they understand that extra-curricular is mandatory, that there will be support (parents) and commitment, that both artistic and academic standards must remain high.

Music theory, history, etc. are taught, I would think more extensively than in a regular high school program. Private teachers would be expected to help a student prepare for requirements in the school program: music being played by the ensemble or orchestra etc. There is a monthly etude exam, with which a private teacher would help prepare. Generally performances are not solos: orchestra, ensemble etc. but the option exists.

An atmosphere exists that allows students to branch out into their own interests: a coffee house for performances for example. So you have jazz groups forming, modern music, but not with a teacher catering to "popular tastes" as in another thread. The arts as a whole form a cohesive and supporting group. A music student walking by might be pulled in to help with drama; dancers applaud the musicians; everyone supports everyone else. That atmosphere extends to teachers and parents who are highly dedicated. Since the past few years performers who are now professionals will arrive from hundreds of miles for a special gala fund raiser to support the school, and some of the students will be involved in tech support (stage lighting, special effects), orchestra pit. In fact, when the annual Gala takes place, former students who are studying at university will make a special trip to take part, so that you have university and high school students sitting side by side in the orchestra pit.

Um.... I got carried away as I usually do. There is an interplay between the private teacher and the school in this case.




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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Nov 19, 2007 11:25 pm

That's interesting to hear!
Well I don't go to a music highschool ... just a normal public school ...
At my school music history and basic theory is taught. It sounds like private lessons work hand in hand with school music lessons. That sounds like a real prestigous highschool with your son.
In my school as well as all other schools across Australia Music is a mandatory subject in Junior High School (grade 7 and 8) ... music is taught in primary schools as well (elementary schools) but in more 'passive' forms: (Singing, movement, dancing, rhythm games, etc)

Having said that in schools music from senior high on wards is taught as an elective subject. Music in schools is taught in a way that is much, much more different to what is taught in private lessons. There is no theory also no need to sightread in highschool. There is generally more of an 'exposure'to differing music styles ... Students write analytical esssays on effects of expressive techniques and draw on the main concepts of music. Students also are taught music appreciation. People are also encouraged to perform in ensembles.
Private lessons are much different, theory is not basic like music lessons in school. The peformance is often solo and sightreading is imporatant ... even though both are teaching music .. they do teach it differently and draw on differing skills and really are two different worlds.
Thanks for posting what is taught in schools in Canada pianissimo ... different areas and schools seem to have different approaches and methods.
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Tue Nov 20, 2007 6:37 am

That sounds like a real prestigous highschool with your son.

Well, it's not prestigious at all, and I wish there were more of its kind for that reason. There are specialized schools or academies of the arts the world over. People pay lots of money to get into them, students often board at the school, an they are a kind of elite. Access to this school is not based on the ability to pay, and the students are not necessarily prodigious - I would say that potential, and a willingness to do what is necessary, motivation, comes into the equation. My son had only been taking lessons for a year when he auditioned so there was no huge repertoire or impressive technique at that point. It was the vision of a handful of teachers who were also artists about 20 years ago, who then approached the schoolboard for permission to starts an arts magnet school. A magnet school is a regular public school that specializes in one area and then opens its doors to students outside of its own jurisdiction. Obviously there has to be some kind of screeing process since there would not be room for everyone, but it also means that it brings together highly motivated students, motivated teachers, and parents who are willing to support both the students and the teachers. That's a powerful and positive combination. I wish there were more of it. We have also had to fight to keep it open because in the new era of economic restraints there is a tendency to close down programs. Parents and former students are involved in fundraising activities, such as the annual gala I mentioned, with former students even traveling several hundred miles in the middle of their postsecondary studies in order to help out. The audition process, purchasing of sheet music, instruments and instrument repair and more, all cost money.
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