Wanting a career in music. - Advice for young students.

Like to talk with other young piano students? This is the place!

Postby Stretto » Sat Dec 17, 2005 11:15 am

What advice would you give young students wanting to make a career in music? What does a young student need to do and know in order to get to that point? What does it take to ensure a young student is prepared and able to get into a good music school or music degree program at the college level? What would you advise a young student considering that goal?

Also, what would you advise teachers to do to ensure an interested student is prepared to get into a music program? If you are a student already in a music program at the college level or heading that direction, what would you wish teachers would have done to prepare you to get to that point that was lacking in your learning? What valuable things did your teacher do or is currently doing to help you reach your goals?




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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Sat Dec 17, 2005 6:08 pm

A lot of questions here for one answer, but a lot can be summed up this way: make them work REALLY hard. I mean that seriously; the most important hing at that stage is for students to begin to get an idea of how very, very hard it is to achieve the kind of excellence needed for any sort of a meaningful, truly professional career--most of them don't have a clue.

Dr. Bill.
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Postby Beckywy » Sat Dec 17, 2005 9:20 pm

Check the credentials of their teacher and make sure they have a good one.
"The real purpose of studying music-to unite ourselves with our special gifts in such a way that one would add strength to the other" Seymour Bernstein
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Postby 108-1121887355 » Mon Dec 19, 2005 5:54 pm

Theory!
Many teachers do not explain what the student is playing as to the theory of music.
Ear training - improvising, composing, and finding intervals, and so on.
Practice!

:D

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Postby Stretto » Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:23 am

What if a person was not a proficient enough pianist to go into performing but they really desired to go into music, what are some other options other than performing in which one could make a living?

There's teaching, the obvious being a music teacher at the preschool through highschool level. What are some other kinds of teaching opportunities in music?

What if a person is not interested in teaching and isn't "good enough" for a performing career or interested, then what are some other options for a career in music?




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Postby 97-1128742375 » Thu May 04, 2006 2:41 pm

yes, i am along the same questions too. how hard is it to become a professor at a well known and outstanding music university? what should young students do to get started if they have a huge interest in the piano world?
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Postby 88keys » Fri May 05, 2006 7:09 pm

Ummmm, Appassionata, I can't read that vibrant green color. I don't know about anybody else. :)
That's my story and I'm sticking with it!
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Postby Stretto » Fri May 05, 2006 8:50 pm

I can read it but it is a little "buggy" on the eyes - I've had a hard time before choosing a color and tried about every possibility in the past and could never settle on one I really liked - I know how hard it is to figure out what color to go with.

As far as the question about becoming a professor, the only thing I've heard was a friend of mine who teaches voice at a university was telling me how hard it was to get on "long term" so it sounded like one needs to be willing to move around at least at first.
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Postby 97-1128742375 » Sat May 06, 2006 12:38 pm

i am so sorry about the green, i dont know how to change it, i tried before!!!! does anyone know how? :O
anyways the idea of long term makes sense, most likely you need to be very flexible!




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Postby Stretto » Sat May 06, 2006 3:00 pm

appassionata wrote:i am so sorry about the green, i dont know how to change it, i tried before!!!! does anyone know how? :O
anyways the idea of long term makes sense, most likely you need to be very flexible!

Hope I didn't miss a step for changing the color of your posts:

Click - "Your Control Panel" found under your user name toward the top of the screen.

Click- "Personal Info".

Click- "Edit your profile".

Find "Post Color" box at the end of your profile - click on the arrow which will bring up color choices.

Click on a color.

Click - Amend my profile to save your color.

Hope that works! Will be anxious to see what color you decide on.



Do you have a career in mind you would like to go for? - just curious.

I started the thread because I was thinking back when I graduated from high school trying to decide a major for college. I wanted to go into music but my line of thinking at 18 was, "I really don't see myself teaching music to elementary or school age kids." I hadn't been around many kids younger than myself growing up and didn't even know if I liked kids let alone teach them! - now I see I would have probably really loved it. Also, for some reason it never entered my mind the idea of becoming a college professor - at 18 who fathoms what a college professor is and what they do, or that such a career exists anyway? Since I decided not to go into music even though that was what I really loved, I went through an Occupational Outlook Handbook reading about different career ideas. It's funny though the train of thought I used to "weed out" different ideas. For example, I read about interior decorators having to organize a lot of other people like painters, etc. to complete a decorating job - I didn't see myself as enjoying trying to organize other people - I realize now I would enjoy organizing people to bring something together, although not interior design! Then I took a couple of those tests that tell what occupations one might enjoy or be good at. They all came up artistic related - that's how I wound up in another art related field to begin with - I felt sort of like I was scrambling for career ideas all because something in the music field would have been my first choice and since I choose not to do that, I was at a loss deciding what to do instead. That was back in the 80's so hopefully now students have more help in the way of internet, career fairs, etc., etc. to give them an idea of possible career choices. :p




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Postby Stretto » Sat May 06, 2006 3:08 pm

p.s. - The other reason I started the thread is because when I finally went to go to college for a music degree eventually, then I learned a lot about theory, ear-training, music history that left me wondering why I hadn't learned any of that prior in taking lessons. It would have helped me tremendously had I started learning more about theory and had more ear-training behind me in jr. high and high school. For example, it wasn't until college that I learned what an interval was or a root position chord, or inversions, etc., or about form. I didn't even know that classical music was really divided into Baroque, Classical, etc., etc. as far as history. In lessons, I guess a lot of times students like me tend to learn more about how to play the music on the page with no understanding of the theory or history behind the music. Like me, I wound up in college totally unprepared at least as far as theory, ear-training, and music history are concerned. I did fine learning those things but had to do more reading and studying to keep on it than if I would have learned more of those things prior.



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Postby 97-1128742375 » Sat May 06, 2006 4:31 pm

thank you for the instructions! like the color?? :) i hope it is easier to read!
well, i am not really sure what i want becuase i am not up to that point just yet, however, i am positive i would like to take music as a career. i was thinking of a university professor and/or performer.
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Postby Tranquillo » Wed Oct 08, 2008 7:39 am

Stretto wrote:What if a person is not interested in teaching and isn't "good enough" for a performing career or interested, then what are some other options for a career in music?

There are many jobs one can find as a musician. Many musicians also have other jobs ...

Accompanying - a soloist or a large/small ensemble

Music Therapy - Integrates performing as well as many other facets of music and communication

Composing - Freelancing and sending work in for competitions or trying to get it signed

Arranging - Many also work as composers and teachers

Being a Music Academic - Researching and writing journals

Managing - Taking part of the business side of music looking at finances, productions, etc

Performing(background music) for receptions, weddings, pre-concert entertainment, etc

They are just a few ideas ... there is a lot out there!

Still the competition is hard ... so be forewarned.
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Postby celia » Thu Oct 09, 2008 12:46 am

Becibu, what is music therapy? Having done pre-school teaching for 12 years I am slowly getting into other areas of work, (probably don't qualify as a young student!! but still stuck on the whole career thing...) I love piano teaching, tutoring dyslexic kids, and I am trying find a job where I can train up as an intervention therapist for autistic kids... so music therapy sounds interesting...
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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Oct 09, 2008 6:48 am

celia wrote:Becibu, what is music therapy? Having done pre-school teaching for 12 years I am slowly getting into other areas of work, (probably don't qualify as a young student!! but still stuck on the whole career thing...) I love piano teaching, tutoring dyslexic kids, and I am trying find a job where I can train up as an intervention therapist for autistic kids... so music therapy sounds interesting...

Glad to have you ask.

Celia, I have ALWAYS wanted to get into music therapy, and I done a great amount of research in this area so I hope I can impart to you what I have read.

Music Therapy is basically like seeing a doctor or a psychologist. Only instead of medicine used to heal, music is used as a medium to treat people. The concept of music and medicine merge together. The difference between music therapy and music education is the music therapist would care about the physical, social, emotional and psychological development of a person, whereas with music education the music instructor would tailor lessons to help the student develop musically.

A typical music therapy session would consist of the music therapist and the person being treated. Did you know that we have an establishment of natural pulse and rhythm? We walk on a continuous pulse ... we keep 'on time' ... a person with Parkinson's disease does not have this, the concept of pulse is thrown out the window, however, music serves as an assisting agent to a person with Parkinson's. When music is played (and its got to be the right music) there have been cases where a person with Parkinson's would walk with more consistency, not staggering and 'in time'. Its by understanding this link where music can go hand in hand and serve as a therapy and aid to walking ... eventually having the person's with Parkinson's being able to walk better.

As far as autistic kids, I have a friend with Aspergers Syndrome (a higher functioning form of Autism) who is seeing a music therapist. He says he enjoys the sessions. Music therapists do see people with Autism ... its quite common actually and I have read about Autistic kids being able to communicate in some ways after seeing a music therapist.

A music therapist often has to spend several years in a university or 'college' to obtain a degree. A music therapist should be a skilled musician and should be able to play several differing instruments. A music therapist should also have skills to improvise, arrange and compose as well as skills to communicate and work with different people - kids, adults, elderly autistic people, people that have been through emotional trauma etc.

I hope I helped ... its a great area to look into if you are interested and Music Therapy is a great job for Autistic kids , music and therapy.

By the way, there is no 'wrong' for adults to get involved with the student forum! If anything its refreshing to have an adult perspective. Post away! :)
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