Composer - mozart - share what you know - Admiration - facts - life - music

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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 08, 2007 7:15 am

One of my favorite composers has got to be Mozart the child geneius.

Born in Salzburg 1756 he composed over six hundred works. Making his way with his father Leopold who nutured that talent in him and relizing that he had a child prodigy in his hand he certainly exploited Mozarts gifts to the full.

I thought of starting this thread to discuss about composers and any interesting facts or qualities that you find.

Mozart's music truly was reflective on his life. After the death of his mother this was truly a turning point in his music. His composition piano sonato no. 8 in A minor reflects this. The fact that it was in a minor key was something. Musicains at that time saw that composing in a minor key was incomplete. Particually in A minor it has this bold like quality. In the thrid movement particually there is that haunting theme that returns like he cant get his mothers death off his mind.

Anyways that was just an interesting bit of information on Mozart I read... please share what you know! :)
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Mon Oct 08, 2007 10:53 am

I am curious about the other Mozart. Wolfgang Amadeus was nurtured and vigorously trained from an early age along with his sister Nanette. The two children were presented in courts at an early age by their astute father. They wowed the audience of their time with excellent playing, and tricks like playing through a cloth spread over the keys. Once she became a teen, and I assume because it was unseemly for a young lady to have a career in music, Nanette disappeared. What happened to Nanette? Did she have equal gifts to those of her brother? did she ever compose? Did she continue playing in parlours among family and friends? Was she as talented as her brother?
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 08, 2007 5:27 pm

I am curious about the other Mozart. Wolfgang Amadeus was nurtured and vigorously trained from an early age along with his sister Nanette. The two children were presented in courts at an early age by their astute father. They wowed the audience of their time with excellent playing, and tricks like playing through a cloth spread over the keys. Once she became a teen, and I assume because it was unseemly for a young lady to have a career in music, Nanette disappeared. What happened to Nanette? Did she have equal gifts to those of her brother? did she ever compose? Did she continue playing in parlours among family and friends? Was she as talented as her brother?




hrmm that is interesting. I was watching a documentry the other day...
With Clara Schumann her father dreamt of ther becoming a concert pianst. The only thing was that she got married to Robert and bore children and became a housewife. Robert was a composer due to his hand injury and she missed playing the piano since he needed his 'silence'.

But it seemed that her path was originally to go with music. However, with Anna Maria (Nanette/Nannerl) as far as I know she kept loyal with her father Leopold. I think it was in one of is letters when he was mad with Mozart when he acknowledged his faithful daughter on his side taking care of him. She probably saw the need for her to stay in Salzburg looking after her father...especially after the time of his mothers death.
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Postby Tranquillo » Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:17 pm

Just did a bit more research...

http://www.mozartproject.org/biography/mozart_n.html

That explained Nannerl's situation. I dont know how accurate the source is but it turns out Nannerl gave piano lessons in Salzburg. The only thing is Salzburg was not like Vienna at the time. Musicains flocked to Vienna ... Vienna was the 'it' place.
Around the time of Mozart's rebellion when he was no getting along with he father Leopold she 'surrended'to the control of her father Leopold.

I am intrigued to find out more ... Looking into getting my hands on a copy of the letters that Mozart , Leopold and Nannerl sent to each other.
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Tue Oct 09, 2007 3:27 pm

This may qualify as "going from the sublime to the ridiculous", but you might want to read our Meet the Composer Interview of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to find out where Mozart did some of his composing. :D
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
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Postby M&m » Tue Oct 09, 2007 6:19 pm

This is interesting...

Mozart Behaving Badly

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/features/story/0,,1294717,00.html

My son also has a tic problem. Knowing his personality, obsessions and reading about Mozart I can see where the author is are coming from. I know it is not proven. There is some speculation that Mozart was also somewhere on the Autism Spectrum.
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Postby M&m » Tue Oct 09, 2007 6:29 pm

but then...here is a medical journal stating the opposite...

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1296923

that he did not have Tourettes and it explains why.
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Postby Tranquillo » Tue Oct 09, 2007 6:57 pm

Mozart seems like an composer that has various theories. He seems to have a debatable medical history. I read through bits of those articles and it really recaps on his medical history ... Yes I have read else where on the autism aspect of Mozart.
Despite all this music therapists and other researches reccommend listening to Mozart for ones that are Autistic also Dyslexia... Has anyone heard of the Mozart effect? It is the basic belief that Mozart's music is benefiacail in many ways for example: K 488 - Sonata for two pianos... has had an effect on those with epliepsia ... it supposely reduces the number of seizures.

M&m since you have mentioned that your son is Autistic do you know muc about Mozart's effect?
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Postby Stretto » Tue Oct 09, 2007 8:03 pm

I like the idea of discussing composers as a topic. It gives us a chance to keep our knowledge of the composers fresh and learn more as well.
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Postby Tranquillo » Tue Oct 09, 2007 8:28 pm

I like the idea of discussing composers as a topic. It gives us a chance to keep our knowledge of the composers fresh and learn more as well.


Glad you like it Stretto! I love reading the history and lives of such ones but discussing them just brings hisitory back to life!

Keep those thoughts coming in!
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Postby M&m » Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:03 am

Becibu wrote:M&m since you have mentioned that your son is Autistic do you know much about Mozart's effect?

Well, wikipedia says, "The Mozart effect refers to disputed scientific studies that test a theory suggesting that classical music increases brain activity more positively than other kinds of music,[1] and that listening to certain kinds of complex music may induce a short-lived (fifteen minute) improvement in the performance of certain kinds of mental tasks known as "spatio-temporal reasoning"....

and from PubMed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites....9090630 "reported may enhance the learning of standard curricula, such as mathematics and science, that draw heavily upon spatial-temporal reasoning."

When my son was around 1 we used to have him listen to Piano Classics every night as he went to bed to calm him and keep him in his bed. He also loved the Baby Einstein videos. He loved the music as well as the movement of objects.

When he would have a meltdown his speech teacher noticed at 2 1/2 that he would hum Mozart to calm himself.

As he got older we downloaded Music Notes Player and he would follow along memorizing the songs. One of his favorites was from the fourth movement of Mozart's Divertimento No. 14, K.V. 270. The instruments played were 2 parts for Oboe, Horn, and Bassoon. He would memorize each part and then would somehow be able to play the melody of them together on his old 66 key electronic keyboard.

Every time we would play that Mozart song on the Music Notes he would get to a certain point and just die laughing. We finally figured out that one of the bassoons notes sound like flatuation.

There is another song by Mozart that we listen to in the car that makes him laugh. I am not sure what it is called without going out to my car to look. No other composers music has this effect on him.

My husband says that Mozart tuned into the music of the universe somehow (in his opinion).

My son says that Mozart "tricks out" his music. I guess on the movie Amadeus it was described as "too many notes"

For some reason I am incredibly interested in Mozart because of this effect he has on my son.
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Postby Tranquillo » Wed Oct 10, 2007 4:36 pm

Well, wikipedia says, "The Mozart effect refers to disputed scientific studies that test a theory suggesting that classical music increases brain activity more positively than other kinds of music,[1] and that listening to certain kinds of complex music may induce a short-lived (fifteen minute) improvement in the performance of certain kinds of mental tasks known as "spatio-temporal reasoning"....

and from PubMed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites....9090630 "reported may enhance the learning of standard curricula, such as mathematics and science, that draw heavily upon spatial-temporal reasoning."

When my son was around 1 we used to have him listen to Piano Classics every night as he went to bed to calm him and keep him in his bed. He also loved the Baby Einstein videos. He loved the music as well as the movement of objects.

When he would have a meltdown his speech teacher noticed at 2 1/2 that he would hum Mozart to calm himself.

As he got older we downloaded Music Notes Player and he would follow along memorizing the songs. One of his favorites was from the fourth movement of Mozart's Divertimento No. 14, K.V. 270. The instruments played were 2 parts for Oboe, Horn, and Bassoon. He would memorize each part and then would somehow be able to play the melody of them together on his old 66 key electronic keyboard.

Every time we would play that Mozart song on the Music Notes he would get to a certain point and just die laughing. We finally figured out that one of the bassoons notes sound like flatuation.

There is another song by Mozart that we listen to in the car that makes him laugh. I am not sure what it is called without going out to my car to look. No other composers music has this effect on him.

My husband says that Mozart tuned into the music of the universe somehow (in his opinion).

My son says that Mozart "tricks out" his music. I guess on the movie Amadeus it was described as "too many notes"


For some reason I am incredibly interested in Mozart because of this effect he has on my son.


That is really really interesteing! WOW!
I wonder what is in Mozart's music that really 'does something'.
The thing is I wonder how exactly it is supposed to work. You see, I did an IQ test and scored high the first time when not listening to MOzart, when I did it the second time I lost ten marks!

Yes perhaps it may be 'too many notes' or that amazing child prodigy brain of his.
His music like many composers and like much music that has evolved over the centruries reflects the life that he had. The time of his mothers death was a turning point to his music. He wrote a sonata in a Minor Key. The famous mozarts requiem that is unfinished some believe that he knew it was the time of his death ... he knew he was dying.




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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Nov 08, 2007 5:41 am

Hopefully the 'mozart effect' rubs off on me for my exams! :laugh:



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Postby 112-1182392787 » Thu Nov 08, 2007 6:09 am

You see, I did an IQ test and scored high the first time when not listening to MOzart, when I did it the second time I lost ten marks!

I think that as a budding musician you do not listen to music passively as a background to your tasks the way a non-musician might. Therefore during the IQ test your attention would be divided, because you would be listening to the Mozart as well, understanding it. When I am someplace having a conversation I am often rude and ask that the background music be turned off, because I cannot attend properly to the conversation. It has happened that in the middle of talking I have exclaimed "Fascinating and wonderful!" because I caught something in the music - which is where my errant ear went - which can be embarrassing if your host has just told you her favourite cat has died. A sudden happy smile is also an inappropriate response. :p
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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Nov 08, 2007 9:36 pm

pianissimo wrote:
You see, I did an IQ test and scored high the first time when not listening to MOzart, when I did it the second time I lost ten marks!

I think that as a budding musician you do not listen to music passively as a background to your tasks the way a non-musician might. Therefore during the IQ test your attention would be divided, because you would be listening to the Mozart as well, understanding it. When I am someplace having a conversation I am often rude and ask that the background music be turned off, because I cannot attend properly to the conversation. It has happened that in the middle of talking I have exclaimed "Fascinating and wonderful!" because I caught something in the music - which is where my errant ear went - which can be embarrassing if your host has just told you her favourite cat has died. A sudden happy smile is also an inappropriate response. :p

Well, then how does it work? Do you listen to it before an exam or something (got my major school exams on MONDAY!)... I am very interested in sound/music therapy ... but the way it works mystifies me ... Mozart has a big impact on this ...
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