What music inspires you?

All topics musical, not specifically piano-related

Postby Beckywy » Wed Nov 22, 2006 5:58 pm

What piece of music, when you listen to it, it inspires you to create, practice, or do something great?
"The real purpose of studying music-to unite ourselves with our special gifts in such a way that one would add strength to the other" Seymour Bernstein
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Postby Stretto » Sun Nov 26, 2006 3:28 pm

Sorry, I haven't been able to think of any specific pieces off hand. I know there have been times I'll hear a piece that I feel that way but can't think of the names of any off the top of my head. Of course, Fur Elise is one I never tire of. I can even listen to it on a little battery operated musical toy and still find the tune inspiring. Also, Canon in D, the strings version is most inspiring.

I thought of a few now as I was typing: lots of string quartet music by the master composers/ Mozart, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik/ George Winston's Linus and Lucy - The Music of Vince Guaraldi. And for some reason I get inspired by Bach's English Suites, my favorite being #3.

I'll post back if I think of something else.

How about music that inspires you, Beckywy? - good question by the way.




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Postby Stretto » Sun Nov 26, 2006 3:31 pm

p.s. a person ought to keep a separate collection of music one is most inspired by so when not feeling inspired or needing a boost of energy to pull the "inspiring" collection out.
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Postby Mins Music » Tue Nov 28, 2006 4:28 pm

Rachmaninnoff's 18th Variation on a theme of Pagannini inspired me so much I wrote a complete novel based around it. I still love the characters that piece inspired, and I still love to listen to the piece. (I'm also helping a student learn it atm).

Another piece I find inspirational is Bach's Brandensburg Concerto no.4 in G major. I listen to it really loud, lights out, lying down. It usually gets about 4 repeats. It inspires me to keep forking out lots of money to go see orchestral concerts!!
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Postby Beckywy » Tue Nov 28, 2006 7:36 pm

Mine right now is "Somewhere over the Rainbow/What a wonderful world" sung by Israel Kamakawiwo'ole.

Makes me want to hug my kids and tell them that all is right in the world.
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:57 am

Mins Music wrote:Rachmaninnoff's 18th Variation on a theme of Pagannini inspired me so much I wrote a complete novel based around it.

Boy, that's inspiration!!!! :cool:

I'm afraid that I don't have anything so "inspired" to report. Most of you have heard me say that I find the Bach Partitas and Sonatas for Solo Violin to hugely inspiring, particularly the D minor Partita, though mostly I'm just in awe of the music.

As with anyone else, I could name many Beethoven and Brahms works, both solo piano and orchestral, but let me mention some slightly less well-known works instead. I find the Sibelius symphonies very uplifting, particularly the 2nd and the 6th. They have a certain unique and compelling grandeur that other composers have never been able to match.

For different reasons, I also listen a lot to the Roy Harris 3rd Symphony, a 20th Century work. Although it isn't strictly programmatic, it has an "air" that is evocative of the spectacular scenery of the American West, embodied in a tight, single movement structure that is largely classical in structure. It deserves to be better known. Fans of the classic movie, "2001 - A Space Odyssey" will recognize snippets of it used in the movie. Anyway, those are just a few examples.
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Sat Dec 02, 2006 1:51 pm

I could name many classics: Brahms' 2nd Piano Concerto, Beethoven's "Hammerklavier" Sonata and String Quartets in A minor and C-sharp minor, the Bach B-minor Mass. But there are some awesome contemporary works, too, that I find uplifting: "Quartet for the End of Time" by Messiaen, which he wrote in a German prison camp during WW II; Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra--one of his last works, written when dying of cancer; "Ancient Voices of Children" by George Crumb, very moving and poignant music.

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