Attending performances - What musical performances do you attend?

All topics musical, not specifically piano-related

Postby Stretto » Mon Jul 11, 2005 11:22 pm

:cool:
Do you attend musical performances?

How often do you attend and mainly what are your favorite types of performances to attend? Instrumental or vocal solos? Choral groups? Operas? Symphonies? Chamber music? Concert bands? Jazz bands? Etc.?

What are your least favorite types of musical performances to attend and why?

Out of the performances you have attended, what have been your all-time favorites and what about them made them so great?

Has attending performances helped you in your musical study?
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Postby 65-1074818729 » Tue Jul 12, 2005 8:02 pm

I have attended a number of performances over the years, and I must say I enjoyed most of them. The only type of music I am not partial to, is opera. I am not sure why, but it just doesn’t do anything for me.

As long as the music is well performed, with good acoustical surroundings, I will enjoy most everything. I enjoy a good orchestra and I enjoy a good military band. I have seen some great performances by the US Marine Band, as well as some of the British military bands. They are true professionals.

I attended a performance by Frank Mills, a piano player/composer, about four years ago. He composed Music Box Dancer, and many other instrumental pieces which became quite popular. I must say, he really knows how to work up a crowd and give a top notch performance.

Even with all of the digital recording equipment used to produce CD’s etc., I find a good live performance much more invigorating.

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Postby Beckywy » Tue Jul 12, 2005 10:26 pm

I attended the symphony here a few times when I was younger and "didn't get it", until I went to Europe and saw the Berlin Philharmonic and the St.Petersburgh Symphony ..then I got it. Same with opera. I didn't understand opera or appreciate it here, but when I went to see opera in Milan, I got it. Comparing the musical culture of Europe to North America, and the age of the audiences here and over in Europe, that is another discussion.
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Wed Jul 13, 2005 11:32 am

Music has been a part of my life since I was a kid, although mostly vocal music then. I was in a school-sponsored performing group in high school that did both popular and classical repertoire.

I didn't really discover instrumental music until college - believe it or not, from a music appreciation course! When I went to grad school at Illinois, I had the good fortune to have a lab directly across the street from the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. Krannert was considered one of the top ten concert halls in the world, acoustically, and attracted the top traveling orchestras and soloists. Because the music school was also just across the street from Krannert and I was dating a musicology major at the time, I had the good fortune to meet many of the soloists and conductors who came to Krannert to perform and/or record - Georg Solti, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Isaac Stern, Luciano Pavarotti (and his family!), Lorin Maazel, Alicia de Larrocha, and on and on. Between Krannert and the music school, I probably attended in excess of a hundred concerts during my time there. Of course, the Chicago Symphony was only a three hour drive away, so I got to see CSO perform several times in Orchestra Hall.

Since leaving Illinois, I've gone to probably another hundred or so concerts in New York City, Sydney, Australia (Lohengrin at the Sydney Opera House), and here in the Albuquerque area (New Mexico Symphony, Chamber Orchestra of Albuquerque, and Santa Fe Opera, as well as numerous solo concerts, including one of pianist Roberta Pili, a PEP A/E Interviewee), among others. In addition, we have held several piano recitals here at my home, which has a superb setup for small concerts.

All of this exposure to music has had a major effect on my appreciation for and love of music. I suppose an argument could be made that PEP itself wouldn't exist had I not had such a varied and deep exposure to music in all forms. There is no question about it: if you want to play and understand music, you have to listen to it, too. As good as modern recordings are, there is no substitute for live performance :)




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Postby Stretto » Thu Jul 14, 2005 7:20 am

Dr. Zeigler:
Out of all the concerts you have attended what, if any, are your favorite types of performances (i.e. symphonies, operas, chamber music, choral, vocal or instrumental solos, etc., etc.)?




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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Thu Jul 14, 2005 8:56 am

Stretto wrote:Dr. Zeigler:
Out of all the concerts you have attended what, if any, are your favorite types of performances (i.e. symphonies, operas, chamber music, choral, vocal or instrumental solos, etc., etc.)?

Boy, that's a hard one to answer! I think the most honest answer is that it would depend on the time. It's taken me some time to develop an appreciation for opera, for example. To this day, I don't really care for most French opera, while I've grown to like Italian and German (mostly Wagner) opera. Amongst instrumental music, I prefer piano solo or piano with orchestra. I've heard so many great pianists (including Dr. Leland) so many times that it's hard to say what, or who, I like best. I guess I would say that I've always been a fan of the late Sviatoslav Richter (though I never had the good fortune to hear him in person) for just about any repertoire. His performances are always interesting and challenging.

As for orchestral music, I like all the usual stuff (Beethoven, Brahms, Mozart etc), but have one somewhat iconoclastic taste. I have always been attracted to the symphonic music of Sibelius, because, to me it has a "spare" kind of grandeur that appeals to me. Although Sibelius was Finnish, and his music was greatly affected by Finland, it also seems appropriate to the grandeur of New Mexico, where I live. Unfortunately, unlike most composers, Sibelius was a violinist, rather than a pianist, so he wrote little for piano.

Anyway, that's my off-the-cuff answer to your question. :D




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Postby Stretto » Thu Jul 14, 2005 10:02 pm

(Dr. Zeigler - thanks for adding your favorite types of performances.)

There's a very nice performing hall for the size of the town I live in which brings in a huge variety of performances. There is also a state college, at least 2 major Bible colleges, and at least 2 good sized private colleges right in town also so there are always plenty of performances to choose from. (Although I seem to never get around to going as much as I would like to).

I don't like solo concertos like piano concertos too much. I'd rather hear the piano or other instrument as a solo or just the orchestra alone. I have an appreciation for opera, I like to watch the performers, and find it 'interesting' to listen to what a singer can do with their voice, but that's about the extent of it. I do really like the symphony, I love string quartets, and I love to watch and listen to Barber Shop quartets although finding performances of them seems few and far between. There is something about a live musical performance that is inspiring. After attending one, I always come home with a spark of enthusiasm to practice more.
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Postby Stretto » Thu Jul 14, 2005 10:40 pm

Quote by Beckywy - July 12: Comparing the musical culture of Europe to North America, and the age of the audiences here and over in Europe, that is another discussion.


That would make a great discussion! It might be interesting in this thread to at least incorporate a discussion comparing the musical performances of various countries and what might make symphonies or operas in Europe, for example, seem so much grander. Beckywy, do you or anyone else have any thoughts on this?

Individuals from each country I'm sure have a unique perspective of the types of performances they like to attend and what about some performances that a person finds more wonderful and grand than others. Especially where certain types of performances and styles originated from, those countries would certainly have the upper hand as to how something should be performed.

There is something to be said of what makes a particular musical performance leave a lasting impression on an individual. Part of what I was getting at in my original string of questions is what is it about a particular performance that makes it really awe-inspiring to someone?

Also, when it comes to ages of those who attend, what types of age variation has anyone noticed in the performances they've been to?
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Postby montana » Fri Jul 15, 2005 8:56 am

I'm very lucky. I live in a little mountain town of about 2000 people but we have a classical music fest a ethnic fest bluegras fest and all kinds of music being played here. Plus there are bigger citys within 75 miles. It's amazing how much great music one can here for little or no money if you just make the effort to go. It is also my duty being a pro musician in this town to go and support these musical proformances any time I am not out there playing myself. I find that once people make the effort to get off the couch and go they have a great time.
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