Piano skills - What are your strengths?

Technique, methods and advice for learners

Postby Mins Music » Sun May 30, 2004 9:33 pm

What would you say is your 'forte' when it comes to piano playing?
"I forget what I was taught, I only remember what I've learnt." - Patrick White, Australian novelist.
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Postby 114-1078657089 » Mon May 31, 2004 6:39 am

Definitely the sight reading :) I'm a very nervous performer, not a composer, and not much of an improviser (fitting chords to songs is easy, but going off and doing interesting things is not). And most of my theory knowledge flew out the window after the grade 8 theory exam...
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Postby 83-1106891658 » Sat Jan 29, 2005 11:56 am

Sight-reading is one of the skills that I enjoy, but I also love to perform.
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Sat Jan 29, 2005 12:22 pm

Welcome to our Forum, Stephen. That's a great repertoire list of favorites you listed--do you play many of those yourself?

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Postby 83-1106891658 » Sat Jan 29, 2005 6:43 pm

Thank you for the welcome! I don't play all of the Beethoven Sonatas, nor all of Chopin's Études. But I do play some of them, and the same with the Rachmaninoff.
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Postby 75-1095335090 » Wed Feb 02, 2005 1:11 pm

I picked Aural skills... it was really a toss up between that and sight reading, though.

I went with the aural skills based on origin... I developed the aural skills through practice... I developed my sight reading skills in exactly the opposite way (as in, I didn't practice a lot in my early years... that lead to a great deal of sight reading at my lessons! lol)

I've never been fond of performing, sometimes I come up with some great compositions, but they are few and far between... I look at that as being a fluke. As for improvising and theory, I'd say I'm really good at them but not as good as the aural skills and sight reading.
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Wed Feb 02, 2005 3:46 pm

Here's one for everybody:

What's the hardest piece you ever played, and what were the most difficult things about it (memory, technique, musical depth, complexity of voicing, etc.)??

Dr. Bill.
Technique is 90 per cent from the neck up.
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Postby Beckywy » Wed Feb 02, 2005 10:32 pm

2nd movement of the Italian Concerto by Bach. I still can't memorize it. There's no beginning, no end, it's just middle.
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Postby Dr. Bill Leland » Thu Feb 03, 2005 9:31 am

GREAT choice! I've always had trouble making a continuous melodic line with all the ornamentation, and still trying to feel and project the rhythm as a slow three.

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Postby 83-1106891658 » Sat Feb 05, 2005 11:52 am

Dr. Bill Leland wrote:Here's one for everybody:

What's the hardest piece you ever played, and what were the most difficult things about it (memory, technique, musical depth, complexity of voicing, etc.)??

Dr. Bill.

Liszt's Campanella, and Béla Bartók's Improvisations on Hungarian Peasant Songs (last movement for the jumps on both hands!)
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Postby Tranquillo » Thu Jan 03, 2008 5:46 am

I looked at the list. A bit overwhealmed at what I need to work on ??? .
I guess I can hear pitches clearly ... I think ... sometimes I sing things off key but I'll hear it and quickly get into the correct key. I have been told by various sources I have a 'good ear' ... I still go off key from time to time! ... So yeah ... not sure if I really have a 'strong point'.
Music is organised sound
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Postby pianogal » Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:03 pm

Same here.
So much pressure hit me as I read the list.
I guess my "forte" would be memorization. Sight-reading, still working on it since I've only learned 3 years with a "6-year-break" after the first year.
Don't ever give up piano, because you will like it someday
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Postby pianogal » Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:08 pm

Most pianists memorize music MENTALLY. (look at the sheetmusic for a moments and play smoothly at the piano)

How in the world do they do that? What might be helpful for me to work on it?
Don't ever give up piano, because you will like it someday
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Postby Tranquillo » Sun Jan 13, 2008 6:03 am

Most pianists memorize music MENTALLY. (look at the sheetmusic for a moments and play smoothly at the piano)


Maybe they have a photographic memory?




Edited By Becibu on 1201054313
Music is organised sound
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Postby 112-1182392787 » Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:09 pm

Patterns.
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