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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2004 8:59 am
by Dr. Bill Leland
I always told students in class: for heaven's sake, don't lose points for the wrong reasons! It's hard enough to know the material without doing dumb things like typos, not reading the question properly, filling in the wrong blank, spelling unintelligibly, etc.--but they do them anyway!!!

Alban Berg was one of Schoenberg's illustrious pupils, but his forte wasn't piano music; it just happens that his Lyric Suite for string quartet is one of my favorite pieces.

Dr. B.

PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2004 2:32 pm
by 108-1079367823
Scriabin is my absolutely favourite and by far.

PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2004 11:08 pm
by 81-1074658942
Most students that are in my age group [that I know] tend to play romantic music. All the time! It drives me a little bit crazy since there's so much out there to explore. :)
So I try to find out about slightly less famous composers and play their work. I'm not entirely sure why I seem to do this so much. I guess I just love "discovering" a piece that I've never seen before, and that doesn't sound just like what all of my other friends are playing. :laugh:

I just ordered the 24 preludes and fugues by Shostakovich. There really aren't too many editions of them at all! or recordings for that matter. but I got the music because i loved the recording so much. They're really brilliant! I don't know why they're so underplayed.

PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 12:24 pm
by 73-1078374881
Perhaps because everyone's playing Romantic pieces? :laugh:

PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2004 3:43 pm
by 110-1079111554
My favourite composer is Telemann. In his day he was more famous than JS Bach & Handel. He wrote more music than both of these guys put together, and they said he could put music to public notices if he wanted to.
I love Telemann and I urge everyone to seek out some of his work. It is Baroque for the man in the street! Mostly easy listening but all great fun - start with his Trumpet Concerto in D major then move onto some keyboard works. I guarantee you will become a fan instantly. I also like Schumann and JS Bach for the keyboard works, but I also love Ralph Vaughan Williams for his modern orchestral works.

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2004 12:12 am
by 69-1080625173
I like nearly all of beethoven's songs compared to liking some of the songs by other composers so I would have to say he is my favourite. The 3rd movement of the Moonlight Sonata is by far my favourite hard-ish song of his, but my favourite extremely difficult song, though not Beethoven; would probably be the Rach 3 because of the huge effect Shine had on me.

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2004 5:28 am
by Mins Music
Hey Eternal dragon! I see you're a fellow Aussie! Welcome to the board. I live a few hours South of you. :;):

PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 11:53 am
by 66-1080699566
I also like Beethoven. I like the fact that his songs express so much emotion. Excluding lagoto, etc, just the dynamic change tells a story full of emotions. I like Debussy but I think that some of his songs are too quiet, that makes it hard to express a great change in dynamic level and emotions. I don't know why but I don't particularly like Bach. I don't want to affend anyone who does, its just not my style of music. So, overall, I think my favorite would have to be Beethoven. :)

PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 9:24 pm
by Chris X
I tend to go through different phases. Right now, I really enjoy Scriabin. I learned his first etude, "Op 2,no.1", and there are many others I hope to learn in the future. Currently, I am focusing on pieces that present technical challenges. My goal right now is to always have a Bach Prelude & Fugue, sonata "Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven," as well as a Chopin etude to work on. I feel though I have a lot of musicality, but I need to gain the technique to pull it off.

Oh, this reminds me, I still have the 2-4 movements of my Beethoven Sonata, Op.2, no.3 to learn. It looks as though I will have a busy summer.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2004 9:45 am
by 81-1074658942
Nicfiddle, I LOVE Telemann. Actually I just love baroque music in general. Baroque and twentieth century... :) good stuff

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2004 12:37 pm
by Dr. Bill Leland
Chris X:

Have you tried any of the later Scriabin stuff? When you get past the early post-Chopin works some of it gets pretty wild. Listen to Richter's recording of the 5th Sonata, or Horowitz on No. 9.

Dr. Bill

P.S. Whatever happened with the Chopin Etude you asked me about?

PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2004 7:03 pm
by 73-1078374881
Quidam wrote:Baroque and twentieth century... :) good stuff

Yay, Quid!!!! Twentieth century music is definitely among my favorites- Copland, Bernstein, Bartok!!! (just as long as it has some sort of melody :cool:). I really REALLY love Rachmaninoff, Debussy, and Ravel. There seems to be clashing opinions on whether they were late Romantic or early Modern. What do you think?

PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2004 7:25 pm
by Mins Music
IPlayTheViolinSoThere wrote:Debussy, and Ravel. There seems to be clashing opinions on whether they were late Romantic or early Modern. What do you think?

Impressionist - the period between romantic and modern!

PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2004 10:24 pm
by 81-1074658942
They were bridges.

Yeah just this morning my teacher was talking about an interesting experience involving a trip to see a Scriabin opera. She's normally quite a fan of contemporary music, but she said it was kind of strange. lol

PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2004 8:54 pm
by Chris X
Dr. Bill Leland wrote:Chris X:

Have you tried any of the later Scriabin stuff? When you get past the early post-Chopin works some of it gets pretty wild. Listen to Richter's recording of the 5th Sonata, or Horowitz on No. 9.

Dr. Bill

P.S. Whatever happened with the Chopin Etude you asked me about?

I have not tried anything other Scriabin, but I have heard some of the later etudes. They definitely look intense.

As for my Chopin etude, your advice is helping. While practicing it slow, I am focusing more on dynamics, even tone, etc. One thing that I am trying to work with is playing completely tense free.