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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 5:24 pm
by 108-1121887355
OK, you comedians, how about a music subject. (And if I had a chocolate coin, I would eat it!)

:laugh:

PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 1:23 pm
by Stretto
loveapiano wrote:I would suggest if you have not tried it, try it! :p

loveapiano,

Just curious, where exactly on the hand to you place the coin?

PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 9:20 pm
by 108-1121887355
I cannot believe you are still on the coin subject and that you are asking this question! Do you really want a reply?

:p

OK, maybe this will end it!!!! Just put ot in the middle of your hand,

PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 9:21 pm
by 108-1121887355
on the back of your hand!

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 5:23 am
by LK123
After reading the posts I can't resist....My piano keys are spaced wide enough for coins. My "loonie" Canadian daughters left a small fortune for my piano tuner to find, all by sticking them in between the keys. My tuner also found Polly Pocket shoes and accessories - don't ask how they got in there!

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 11:51 am
by 108-1121887355
OK, LK, you might as well weigh in.

Yes, they can get between the keys - as I mentioned. But it does not happen without effort and at the lesson it is not a problem. And I do caution students about potenial problems and unhappy results.

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 2:11 pm
by Dr. Bill Leland
Back when I did some professional piano tuning and servicing it was always entertaining to have to pull the action out of a teacher's piano. You wouldn't believe some of the stuff I found in there, most of it fallen down behind the key cover or between the strings, though a few in between and below keys: little gummed stars of all colors, cards, paper clips, rings, earrings, return address stickers, stamps, hair pins and bobby pins, life savers, and one razor blade. I'm sure Cy could add to this list.

B.L.

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 2:54 pm
by Stretto
I started a thread regarding things falling between the keys in the "Piano Values and Maintenance" forum for anyone interested. This thread got me to thinking about it because I've always wondered how detrimental it is.

PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 9:44 pm
by drewnchick
Stretto wrote:That's funny that your students tend to start out with wrists way up. The biggest problem I've noticed with a few is wrists caved in or collapsed way below the keys.


I've had the exact same problem! A lot of my beginner students like to "rest" their wrists on the piano below the keyboard!

Anyone have any ideas for word pictures related to movement to describe some of the ways you'd want a student to play?



To keep a steady wrist, I "balance a Coke" or whatever drink they like on their wrist, and tell them NOT to spill it into my piano or onto their clothes! (All imaginary, of course! :p )

We also "float off" from phrase endings like balloons are tied to our wrists. So far, nobody has seen the dichotomy of "floating wrists" with "Cokes" on them! :laugh:

PostPosted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 10:01 am
by Stretto
drewnchick wrote:
Anyone have any ideas for word pictures related to movement to describe some of the ways you'd want a student to play?



To keep a steady wrist, I "balance a Coke" or whatever drink they like on their wrist, and tell them NOT to spill it into my piano or onto their clothes! (All imaginary, of course! :p )

We also "float off" from phrase endings like balloons are tied to our wrists. So far, nobody has seen the dichotomy of "floating wrists" with "Cokes" on them! :laugh:

That's a great idea! I like to use word pictures to describe things to students.

PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 7:16 pm
by Glissando88keys
Stretto wrote:Anyone have any ideas for word pictures related to movement to describe some of the ways you'd want a student to play?

My piano teacher really helped me by demonstrating how to maintain a "square hand" with machine-like dangling fingers keeping close to the keyboard for scales and arpeggios.
:)




Edited By Glissando88keys on 1153099289

PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 5:11 pm
by 108-1121887355
After an hour and $45.00, I left the music store and my favorite purchase is a book called "Beautiful Etude, Artistic Music that Promotes Technical Devalopment at the Piano" Selected and Edited by Victoria McArthur, published by Alfred.

I was pleased to find transposing and creative ideas and tips for technique suggested, which could lead to more of the same. Most pieces were in the key of C but with transposing, that was probably best. I purchased Book 2, Late elementary and Early Intermediate. I am eager to try it out in September with the "Burgmuller, Czerny, Hanon" I like.

I enjoy much of the summer off and it gives me time to go through a lot of music at home and in the stores. I bought two books with CD's and will be eager to see if and how they are used by the students. Now, I am getting excited to begin again.

New music is especially exciting!