Stumped by a musical term... - Hope you've brushed up on your italian!

Technique, methods and advice for learners

Postby presto » Tue Mar 21, 2006 8:02 pm

My brother and I are learning the first part of von Suppé's "Poet and Peasant" piano duet for a recital, but one of the musical terms in it has us stumped. Do any of you know what "morendo" means? Things like this make me wish I had a good, fat music vocabulary book! :;):
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Postby Christine » Tue Mar 21, 2006 8:40 pm

Without running to my huge musical dictionary, I believe it means "dying away..."

Hope this helps!
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Postby 108-1121887355 » Tue Mar 21, 2006 8:48 pm

Dying away-gradually dimishing the tone and time, is correct.

You can find most anything ina very small pocket dictionary of musical terms. There are several. I have two. They do not cost much. When a student encounters a new term, I have them look it up. I keep them right next to the piano.

Have fun with the duet.
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Postby Stretto » Tue Mar 21, 2006 9:29 pm

There's a free general encyclopedia on the web that I've gotten some good descriptions for musical related topics including terms: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

New Harvard Dictionary of Music says: "Dying, fading away" and that's all it says.




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Postby Christine » Wed Mar 22, 2006 8:36 am

Yes, I use Wikipedia for lots of things (non-music related). I stumbled upon it not too long ago and it is a wealth of information. :)
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Postby presto » Wed Mar 22, 2006 10:05 am

Well, thank you all--yes, that does clear up the confusion. That term came right at the end of one of the parts, so I had a feeling it maybe meant something like ritardendo, or ritardendo diminuendo--but this is more of a diminuendo, then. By the way, I wish I'd thought of looking it up on Wikipedia. Actually, I should have just gone straight to Dictionary.com. I just now tried it out, and it defined it as " dying; a gradual decrescendo at the end of a strain or cadence." Why do we think of simple solutions after the problem is solved? ??? Thanks for such quick help! :)
88 keys--
10 fingers--
No problem!
presto
 
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Postby 108-1121887355 » Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:40 am

It's more fun to get other's minds working! :D
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