Is a website useful for a music teacher? - The pros and cons of running a website

Talk with other teachers, exchange tips, participate in polls regarding a teaching studio business

Postby 115-1100906333 » Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:54 pm

As a piano teacher I have always found it useful to have a website. Even if it is just for letting potential students find out about the service I offer before starting a series of lessons. I am interested to hear teachers views on how they have used websites to enhance their studio.



Edited By Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Editor on 1119229597
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Wed Feb 02, 2005 9:01 am

I have reviewed in excess of a thousand piano teacher sites in connection with linking them on PEP's Piano Teacher Web Sites page. As with most other things, whether a teaching studio site is useful or not depends on the circumstances and how the site is written. These days, I think teacher sites are most effective when they serve more than one function: information for current students, help for potential students, introducing the teacher (so that new students have a sense of the teacher as a person before they call) and as a source for policy and event information.

I know from e-mails that I've gotten from numerous teachers whose sites we have linked that they have gotten students from their sites that they would have gotten no other way. Perhaps the best example is the case of a teacher in Oregon who got a very good student from Germany who was moving to her area. He saw her web site linked on PEP, visited it, and signed up from Germany.

Of course there are lots of do's and don'ts connected with writing a studio web site, many of which are discussed in my article on PEP, Establishing a Studio Web Site. If anybody is interested in hearing more on that topic, I can post on it later.

To be honest, I think the best studio sites are those written by the teacher or someone close to him/her. Professionals tend to get enamored of the technology and miss obvious things, so unless the teacher takes an active role in writing the site, it often doesn't help much to have a professional do it. The best advice I can give any teacher starting a web site is to sit down and carefully outline the contents of the site before they start writing it. That outline, just like that for a term paper, gives an immediate sense of the structure and content of the site. It's invaluable in organizing your thoughts and making sure you don't miss something obvious.
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
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Postby Lyndall » Fri Feb 04, 2005 9:48 am

In my case a website probably wouldn't make sense since I'm not wanting to recruit new students, plus, many of my current students' parents (& therefore the students) are not web-savvy. Less than half of them even have an e-mail address for me to send monthly newsletters/bills etc. I would really love to set up a site but I feel like people are busy enough as it is - some barely read the things I currently send home or e-mail.

I do love to read all the teacher's websites I can find though 'cause you get so many ideas re: incentive programs, policies, theory games etc. Thanks for the list of links you provide - I've bookmarked many of them & refer to them for updates constantly - St Louis I just added yours.
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Postby pianoannie » Sat Feb 12, 2005 11:33 pm

A website is on my list of things I'd like to do! I already use email to communicate with most of my students, and I am adding more computer games to my resources for students. I just haven't taken the time yet to learn how to get one set up, how to keep it running smoothly, and what things I would want it to include. I'm hoping that when I have a few weeks off in the summer, I can tackle this.
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Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Thu Jun 16, 2005 8:52 am

It occurred to me that I ought to update this thread with some additional information. A couple months ago I posted a new article, Setting Up a Web Page for Your Studio - Part 2 Do's and Don'ts with lots of tips on what to include, and leave out of, a studio web site. Those who are interested may read that article, but one of the most important things said in that article is that you must not plagiarize others writings on your web site. The Web may be "wide open," but that won't get you out of a VERY expensive copyright infringement suit, if you get caught. ???
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
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