Bartering lessons - Does swapping for lessons work?

Talk with other teachers, exchange tips, participate in polls regarding a teaching studio business

Postby jenscott90 » Thu Sep 25, 2008 7:20 pm

When I lived in St Louis, I bartered for lessons with a mom who had two teenage daughters, lovely girls, who had just started out and had the best attitudes and hearts. I think I would have given them lessons for free, but instead, the mom made jewelry with real silver bali beads and various gemstones and beads, so I asked her if we could swap. She normally sells at trade shows and craft shows, so I asked her to tell me what she normally charged, and to decide how many weeks we should trade for...eventually I got a beautiful set (she custom made for me!) and her girls got two months of lessons. It worked out beautifully, but has never been needed again as of yet. :)
User avatar
jenscott90
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu May 24, 2007 7:20 am
Location: Central Illinois

Postby celia » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:55 pm

I thought I would add to this thread as I have just today arranged a barter arrangement of a completely different kind. I know the student and his mother very well as I have been looking after him at pre-school for several years. She breeds the most beautiful cuddly Birman kittens and I have wanted one for years but at $500 they are not cheap!! So we are just going to keep note each week of when the student has his lesson, how much I have "paid" towards the cat. The only danger I can see is that he may quit lessons for any reason at some point. So I have made it clear that this would not be a problem and I would happily pay the "remaining balance" for the cat!! (not born yet!) Hopefully he will not quit, the first lesson went really well!!! Anyone else bartered lessons for a pet?!
celia
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Wed Oct 01, 2008 7:32 am

celia wrote:I thought I would add to this thread as I have just today arranged a barter arrangement of a completely different kind. I know the student and his mother very well as I have been looking after him at pre-school for several years. She breeds the most beautiful cuddly Birman kittens and I have wanted one for years but at $500 they are not cheap!! So we are just going to keep note each week of when the student has his lesson, how much I have "paid" towards the cat.

It's noteworthy that you're still using monetary instruments to value the barter arrangement. It's often done that way and makes good sense. You'll still love the cat just as much! :D

For some cautions and help with barter arrangements, see my article Bartering for Piano Lessons.
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
User avatar
Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed
Site Admin
 
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 6:46 pm
Location: Rio Rancho, NM USA

Postby missopiano » Thu Nov 20, 2008 9:17 am

HI
There is an alternative to bartering for lessons due to financial difficulties. The program is called MusicLInk and I have found that it is really a very good program designed to help students/parents that truly are in need.
MusicLink is coordinated with the local music teachers associations, and I believe is somehow endorsed by groups such as MTNA.
The parents much fill out a MusicLink application and then are screened even more by the MusicLink state coordinator. it is made clear that everyone takes this program seriously so that it does not get abused.
Parents DO pay something for lessons, and that price is usually coordinated between the state coordinator, teacher and student.
This program has partnerships with most of the major music publshing companies, as well as the major music software companies, and other related companies such as Bose, etc.
It is a program designed to help students/parents that are REALLY in need. And so far, from my experience with this program, it does work.
There are also funds made available to help reimburse teachers for music, funds for music camp scholarships.etc.

It is a decent program that is a help at times like this

I find this program to be a very healthy alternative to barter. I am one of those teachers that has been on the negative part of the barter situation and have gotten burned more than once in a barter situation

Nancy Ostromencki
Tucson AZ
User avatar
missopiano
 

Postby Tranquillo » Fri Nov 21, 2008 1:52 am

This is an excellent idea ... but I am guessing it wouldn't work if students had teachers that weren't part of the association. Its a great idea to provide students with opportunities to take lessons as music lessons sometimes can only be given only to the ones that can afford it, which is quite sad sometimes.
Music is organised sound
User avatar
Tranquillo
 
Posts: 465
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:43 pm

Postby missopiano » Fri Nov 21, 2008 8:10 am

One does NOT have to belong to any music teachers association to be able to partake in the MUSICLINK program. I do know from personal experience that often a teacher will accept payment of $1 for lessons via that program. What it does is make the parent aware that something needs to be paid, and not just take advantage of the program.

An interesting idea was developed and done by Dr. Rita Simo in Chicago, I believe the name of her school was, The People's Music School. It was set up to help those that could not pay the usual fees for lessons, and parents had to WORK at the school in some capacity or other to "pay" for their child's lessons. Actually Dr. Rita Simo and her school would be a good interview for the Artist/Educator. She did not take much laziness from anyone at her school and it did succeed.

Cheers
Nancy Ostromencki
Tucson Arizona
User avatar
missopiano
 

Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Fri Nov 21, 2008 9:13 am

Yes, MusicLink is a very worthwhile program. I have linked the web site for several years on our Links page. It is a program that brings together deserving students and teachers willing to teach on full or partial scholarship. It's not quite the same as bartering, but still relevant for those teachers who will consider giving scholarships to students.
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
User avatar
Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed
Site Admin
 
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 6:46 pm
Location: Rio Rancho, NM USA

Postby 112-1182392787 » Fri Nov 21, 2008 9:17 pm

I have looked at the program a couple of times, and have not quite understood how it is a scholarship.
User avatar
112-1182392787
 

Postby missopiano » Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:56 pm

It is a scholarship in a few ways, they do have programs where one can submit the information about a specific student along with a tape or CD of their performing, and often the student is awarded a scholarship, or the way I look at it, I (being the teacher) am awarding a partial scholarship to a student. To help the involved teachers out, the publishing companies, and other companies mentioned earlier do have special discounts, free music packets, etc., to try to help out.

You might want to explore this program a bit more and if need be speak directly with someone running the program to gain more insight.
Hope this helps

Nancy Ostromencki
Tucson Arizona
User avatar
missopiano
 

Postby 112-1182392787 » Sat Nov 22, 2008 7:46 am

A scholarship, in my understanding, means that all or part of a student's education is paid for. So they pay part of your tuition fee on behalf of the student? That is wonderful.



Edited By pianissimo on 1227401898
User avatar
112-1182392787
 

Postby Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed » Sun Nov 23, 2008 8:32 am

pianissimo wrote:A scholarship, in my understanding, means that all or part of a student's education is paid for. So they pay part of your tuition fee on behalf of the student? That is wonderful.

If you go back to my earlier post on this topic, MusicLink doesn't provide money or scholarships for lessons. As the name implies, it brings together deserving students with teachers willing to teach for free or for a reduced fee. The link to the MusicLink site is on my Links page as I indicated earlier.
All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man's life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physical existence and leading the individual towards freedom. - Albert Einstein
User avatar
Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Ed
Site Admin
 
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 6:46 pm
Location: Rio Rancho, NM USA

Postby 112-1182392787 » Sun Nov 23, 2008 10:04 am

I had thought that I read the word "scholarship" when I posted my first question, but I don't see the reference to it now so I must have misread. That is what prompted me to ask about it. Motivated students not being able to access teaching has bothered me for a while. Any initiative, whether privately or as a concerted effort as here, is a welcome one.



Edited By pianissimo on 1227456294
User avatar
112-1182392787
 

Postby missopiano » Sun Nov 23, 2008 10:58 am

MusicLink does provide scholarship money (aka financial assistance) to deserving students for music camps, and for lessons thru the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarships, thru the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. Again, if you go online to their web site, one can find out the information.

They also provide performance opportunities at conferences or business partner functions for high achieving students. It is all on their web site.

Anyway, that is all for now.

Happy Thanksgiving

Nancy Ostromencki
User avatar
missopiano
 

Postby 112-1182392787 » Sun Nov 23, 2008 2:46 pm

This is all quite heartening, Nancy. Thank you for letting us know. I found this like to Jack Kent: http://www.jkcf.org/



Edited By Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Editor on 1227491755
User avatar
112-1182392787
 

Postby Earl » Mon Dec 08, 2008 4:19 am

I think such bartering idea regarding music teaching can be helpful specially to those deserving individuals who love to learn music but lack finances to pursue it. Maybe, I will consider this matter if I already experienced it. But for now, I will stick with my standard charges per student. :;):



Edited By Dr. John Zeigler - PEP Editor on 1228768183
Earl
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 7:38 pm
Location: Utah

PreviousNext

Return to Running a Teaching Studio

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron