Should "popular" music be taught in lessons? - Jazz, top 40, new age, et al.

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Postby Mins Music » Mon May 17, 2004 5:53 pm

Rach3, I can't remember their name -it's a European four syllable name that I can't even pronounce! My husband keeps it in his car, for 'easy' listening (he likes Jazz) :cool:
"I forget what I was taught, I only remember what I've learnt." - Patrick White, Australian novelist.
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Postby Mins Music » Thu May 20, 2004 7:11 pm

The name of the trio is the Jacques Loussier Trio.

He's French. Been doing works like this for forty years!

Have a look at this site, there are samples of his music you can listen to!

http://www.loussier.com/pages/pop_up_cds/bachs_goldberg_variations.htm

Then you can purchase it from here:

http://www.amazon.com/exec....8931003

:)




Edited By Mins Music on 1085102180
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Postby 109-1089922742 » Thu Jul 15, 2004 4:53 pm

I recently started looking through this site and message board-great resources for teachers! but one thing struck me: It is frightening to me how ill equipped most piano teachers are to teach Jazz...aka...American Classical Music. Students are being cheated out of this valuable knowledge. It is such an important part of music that is a crime not to incorporate it into lessons for students of all ages. The more jazz theory the student acquires the easier it is to sight-read, and have instant recognition of chords. The longer a teacher waits to involve jazz and improvisation into students’ lessons, the harder it is for the student to free himself or herself and explore improvisation.
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Postby Mins Music » Thu Jul 15, 2004 8:14 pm

Welcome to the board matthyzer! Great to have your input.
Do have have a favourite Jazz artist? :)
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Postby 109-1089922742 » Thu Jul 15, 2004 8:32 pm

right now, Jeff Jenkins is my favorite jazz player, he's not a huge name but I really like the things he's doing, based in Denver. Benny Green is a beast, and Kenny Barron was just at my school (University of the Arts, Philly, PA).
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Postby Mins Music » Thu Jul 15, 2004 8:37 pm

What are you studying matthyzer? Do you know your ultimate goal?
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Postby 109-1089922742 » Thu Jul 15, 2004 8:49 pm

right now I study with Trudy Pitts at university of the arrt as for my goal..that seems to be the tricky part for any musician. i want to perform, and teach. i play jazz, classical and anything else. I just played a concert at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia with my school.
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Postby Mins Music » Thu Jul 15, 2004 11:12 pm

I know teachers who specialise in Jazz - or should I say, that's they only thing they teach. They're very popular.

Do you play with an ensemble? :cool:

I sometimes 'jam' with a bass guitarist, drummer, and sax. But I'm a better singer than a jazz pianist. Too much classical training I think - my solos can end up sounding a little too sonata-ish!! :p

The more jazz theory the student acquires the easier it is to sight-read, and have instant recognition of chords.


That's an interesting thought. I'm teaching a thirteen year old boy at the moment who just wasn't practising very much and was getting bored with book he was going through (transfered from another teacher). So I've recently been teaching him some Jazz scales, and some riffs for the 12 bar blues. But I've done it all by rote - 'just copy me' sort of thing. He's got a great feel for it, and starting to improvise with imagination.

But now the hard bit is getting him back to reading! I'm going to assign some easy Martha Mier Jazz pieces because they're at his level. Do you have any suggestions for a self confessed lazy thirteen year old boy?
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Postby 109-1089922742 » Fri Jul 16, 2004 6:51 am

i don't do just jazz, for my school you have to do both. My teacher has a classical degree from Juilliard and her first jazz gig was with John Coltrane.

When people say "jazz scales" that's the part that scares me, like there is some all encompassing group of them. I find that most tradiational piano teachers show students that jazz scales are the blues and pentatonic scale, but that is hardly correct. There are so many scales, 3 forms of Pentatonic, Diminished, Dominant Diminished, Wholetone, All the modes of Harmonic Minor and Jazz Minor, Augmented...the list goes on and on.

I don't have anything against the traditional piano teacher but I think more research should be done on their part before trying to teach jazz. I've never used a method book or anything like that and don't know anyone who has for jazz. I did all of that with classical, but I' haven't found a jazz serious of books that were very well done, most seem to be done by classical players who like jazz, but don't play it neccessarily all that well. The only book I've used with jazz is the Real Book, or any fakebook. If the teacher has a concept of how to play out of one of those, that's all the method books you need all in one. I think more time should be put into learning scale and chord theory, which definitely helps with classical training and sightreading. The only real way I've discovered to enhance sightreading is to do it, a lot!

Also listening is a key factor to develop a good swing feel. Hearing how different players perform a tune is important and good for expanding horizons, but teachers shold be careful to not make students emulate a recording, that goes against the entire idea of jazz and freedom in music. Just because a fakebook says a song is swing or a bossa, it can be done in any style.
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Postby Tranquillo » Sun Sep 16, 2007 10:45 pm

I think the thing with teaching popular is not bad there are some good popular hits out there. But at the same time there is trash.
I think the bonus of popular music is the fact that there a often chords up above other wise known as guitar chords. This allows the student to improvise in the left. Popular music is often repetivie and because of this not at all difficult.
Thats just an idea that could be taugh playing it with the chords ... I know a music teacher in my school encouraged reading the music more as she said that doing with the chords makes you a lazy pianist (she was reffering to herself) :;):
Music is organised sound
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